Peter Brooks

by


Peter Brooks may have been born in 1732 or in 1738. He probably was the son of Jonathan and Rebecca Tatten Brooks. He grew up with several siblings in a modest first ward home.

In 1766, he was noted on the Albany assessment roll with his father, Jonathan. In 1779, his lot in the first ward was valued modestly. In January 1767, his account was paid from the city treasury.

In 1768, he was listed among the subscribers at St. Peter's Anglican church. At that time, one person was in his family.

In 1767, his name was included on the roster of an Albany militia company. We seek information on his activities during the 1770s. After the War for Independence, he was accorded a land bounty right in conjunction with the regiment that was drawn from the city of Albany.

In November 1771, he married "Santje Wendels" (Frances Wendell) at the Dutch church in Albany. At that time, both partners were identified as "of this city." In that year, he was counted among the members at St. Peter's. During those years, he witnessed a number of christenings with several Albany women. Until 1790, a number of baptisms with Peter Brooks as the father were recorded in St. Peter's and at the Dutch church. His son and namesake was born in 1780 and lived and worked in Albany for many years.

In 1790, the household of Peter Brooks with eleven family members and three slaves was included on the census for Watervliet. We seek information on his residence and occupation. We believe that his son was the carpenter who was listed in city directories at 100 Hudson Street from 1813 to 1830.

"Frances Brooks, wife of Peter Brooks," died in April 1818 at the age of sixty-five. Perhaps this Peter Brooks lived until March 1825.


biography in-progress


notes

the people of colonial Albany Sources: The life of Peter Brooks is CAP biography number 2665. This sketch is derived chiefly from family and community-based resources.





first posted: 7/10/08