Salomon Goewy

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Referred to variously (Solomon Goewey), Albany resident Salomon Goewy was born in April 1687. He was the son of Albany newcomers Jan Salomonse and Catharina Loockermans Goewy. He was named for his grandfather, a pioneer settler of New Netherland.

This individual appears to have been married [at least] twice. In November or December of 1702, young "Salomon Goewy" of Albany wed "Catharina Dooren" at her Dutch church in New York City. The partners were identified as single people. At least one of their children was christened there. In November of 1726, "Alida, the wife of Salomon Goewy," was buried in the Albany churchyard. In June 1728, Salomon married a then unnamed women (but later called Mary and/or Margaret) at the Albany Dutch church. Between 1714 and 1738, at least eleven more babies were christened at the Albany church where Salomon and his wives were regular baptism sponsors. In 1750, the will of an Albany widow referenced "my daughter Alida, deceased, wife of Salomon Godway."

In 1715, Salomon's name appeared on the roster of an Albany militia company. In 1717, he was appointed fireman for the first ward.

In 1720, only one name represented the family on a county-wide list of freeholders. Perhaps this son was living under Jan Solomonse's third ward roof. By 1742, Salomon's name and probably a different Johannes Goewy appeared on the list of Albany freeholders living in the third ward.

In 1750, his name was referenced in the will filed by his former mother-in-law in the context of him still being alive.

In 1756, his name does not seem to have appeared on the "comprehensive" census of Albany householders taken by the British army.

Dutch church records reveal that "Salomon Goewy" was buried from his church in October 1758.


biography in-progress


notes

the people of colonial Albany Sources: The life of Salomon Goewy is CAP biography number 5173. This sketch is derived chiefly from family and community-based resources. This subject seems to have been the only Salomon Goewy at-risk in the region.




first posted 8/10/13; updated 12/26/13