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BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

ON JUNE 30, 2009, THE BRI PROGRAM OFFICE WILL BE CLOSING DOWN TEMPORARILY. THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF BRI AND THE BRI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ARE WORKING TO REINSTATE STAFF AND WE HOPE TO BEGIN PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE DO NOT ANTICIPATE ANY CHANGES TO THE UPCOMING FALL 2009 BRI BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION LECTURE SERIES OR TO THE 2010 NORTHEAST NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE, SO PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.



Biology and Conservation Lecture Series – Fall 2006

Archive of Past Lectures

The following page is an archive of a past lecture series.
For the current or upcoming lecture series please visit
Biology and Conservation Lecture Series.

 

Promoting Biodiversity Stewardship on Private Forestland in New York State
Wednesday, October 4, 2006 at 12:00 PM

Cover photo of Audubon's foresty manual
 
Dr. Michael Burger, Director of Bird Conservation at Audubon New York, will present the results of field research that examined how the distribution and abundance of certain wildlife species are related to different kinds of northern hardwood forest management. He will discuss how ecologically sustainable forestry practices can be translated into practical concepts for use by private forestland owners in New York State.

Cover image of Audubon's forestry manual

 

 

Utricularia inflata: Yet Another Invasive Threat to Aquatic Biodiversity?
Wednesday, October 11, 2006 at 12:00 PM

Becky Urban with Utricularia inflata

Swollen bladderwort (Utricularia inflata), a non-native freshwater plant, is rapidly invading lakes in the Adirondack Park. Dr. John Titus, Associate Professor of Biology at Binghamton University (SUNY), will share his research documenting the extent and potential ecological impacts of this new aquatic threat.



Becky Urban holding aloft a mass of Utricularia inflata collected from the lake bottom in First Lake (Fulton Chain of Lakes, Adirondack Mountains, Photo by Jeff Bohner)

 

Trends in New York's Rare Plants: Why Have Some Common Plants Become Rare?
Wednesday, October 18, 2006 at 12:00 PM

Flowers of giant pine drops

Most of New York's rare plants have always been rare because they are at the edge of their range or require habitats that are uncommon. Some species, however, were once common in the state, but are now considered rare. Steve Young, Program Botanist with the New York Natural Heritage Program, will talk about the causes of downward trends for some of these species.

 

Flowers of giant pine drops (Pterospora andromedea, photo by Al Schotz)

 

 

Grassland Birds in the Northeast: Ecology, Management, and Conservation
Wednesday, October 25, 2006 at 12:00 PM

Panicum grassland, photo by Chris Norment  
Populations of obligate grassland breeding birds in the Northeast have declined significantly during the last four decades. However, their management and conservation pose particular problems due to the dynamic nature of regional landscapes. Dr. Chris Norment, Professor of Environmental Science and Biology at SUNY Brockport, will discuss the ecology and conservation of grassland birds in the region.

Panicum grassland, Oak Orchard Wildlife Management Area, NY (photo by Chris Norment)

 


The Biology and Conservation Lecture Series is sponsored by the New York State Biodiversity Research Institute

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