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BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

ON JUNE 30, 2009, THE BRI PROGRAM OFFICE WILL BE CLOSING DOWN TEMPORARILY. THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF BRI AND THE BRI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ARE WORKING TO REINSTATE STAFF AND WE HOPE TO BEGIN PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE DO NOT ANTICIPATE ANY CHANGES TO THE UPCOMING FALL 2009 BRI BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION LECTURE SERIES OR TO THE 2010 NORTHEAST NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE, SO PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.



Biology and Conservation Lecture Series – Fall 2007

Archive of Past Lectures

The following page is an archive of a past lecture series.
For the current or upcoming lecture series please visit
Biology and Conservation Lecture Series.

 

Recent Land Snail Discoveries and Questions in New York
Wednesday, October 10, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Four kinds of land snails not previously reported from New York State have been discovered, raising new questions about snail ecology in the Northeast as our climate changes. Ken Hotopp, of Appalachian Conservation Biology, presents research conducted with Dr. Tim Pearce of the Carnegie Museum.

 

How Can Earthworms Be the Bad Guys and Salamanders Not Be Able to Help?
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 at 12:00 PM

The behavior and ecology of introduced earthworms make them a threat to forest processes and species composition. While salamanders help with earthworm control, they unable to stem earthworm advances. Dr. Richard Wyman, director emeritus and senior research associate of the Huyck Preserve & Biological Research Station, presents new research into these complex interactions.

 

Forest Herb Community Recovery in New York’s Second-Growth Forests
Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Nearly one-half of New York’s secondary woodlots are recovering from two centuries of agricultural conversion, but native forest herb communities have been slow to recover. Dr. Gregory McGee, adjunct assistant professor at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, describes factors limiting the re-establishment of forest herbs.

 

Our Native Orchids as Organisms: Some Biological Minutia and Implications for Conservation
Wednesday, October 31, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Hooker's Orchid 

The biological diversity of orchids presents conservation challenges beyond simple preservation. Dr. Charles Sheviak, curator of botany at the New York State Museum, presents an overview of the native orchids of the Northeast, with emphasis on their habitats and ecological relationships.

 

Hooker's Orchid (Platanthera hookeri), photo by Charles Sheviak

 

 


The Biology and Conservation Lecture Series is sponsored by the New York State Biodiversity Research Institute

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