An Adirondack wetland

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New York State
BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

ON JUNE 30, 2009, THE BRI PROGRAM OFFICE WILL BE CLOSING DOWN TEMPORARILY. THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF BRI AND THE BRI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ARE WORKING TO REINSTATE STAFF AND WE HOPE TO BEGIN PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE DO NOT ANTICIPATE ANY CHANGES TO THE UPCOMING FALL 2009 BRI BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION LECTURE SERIES OR TO THE 2010 NORTHEAST NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE, SO PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.



Biology and Conservation Lecture Series

Fall 2009 Schedule

FREE lectures at the New York State Museum
Wednesdays at noon, in the Carole F. Huxley Theater

Directions to the NYS Museum/Cultural Education Center
(The theater is located on the first floor of the museum.)

Download PDF Lecture Series Flyer   Download a PDF flyer of this lecture series for posting.

 

White-nose Syndrome—the Darkest of Nights for North American Bats
Presenter: Alan Hicks, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Date and Time: Wednesday, October 7, 2009 at 12:00 p.m.

Tri-colored bat photo by Alan Hicks Lecture Overview: During the winter of 2005–2006, a disease appeared in a Schoharie County cave that has, in only three years, nearly eliminated the bats that winter in the Northeast. White-nose syndrome is spreading quickly and is expected to envelop most of eastern North America within the next few years. If current trends continue, 25 of the 45 bat species in the United States will be at risk, with extinctions being a real possibility. Alan Hicks, the bat specialist for New York State’s endangered species program, will present information about the history, current status, and future conservation efforts regarding this unprecedented problem.

Photo: Tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) with white-nose syndrome in Barytes mine. (Photo by Alan Hicks)

 

Impacts to Wildlife from the Consequences of Exurban Development in the Adirondack Park
Presenter: Dr. Michale Glennon, Wildlife Conservation Society, Adirondack Program
Date and Time: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 12:00 p.m.

Lecture Overview: Exurban development refers to low-density, large lot development outside the boundaries of incorporated cities and towns. Research suggests that large-scale fragmentation resulting from exurban development may decrease biotic integrity, alter species behavior and composition, and increase human-wildlife conflict. Dr. Michale Glennon, a scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Adirondack Program, will discuss her work to understand the responses of avian communities surrounding residential homes in the Adirondacks.

 

Benthic Biodiversity in the Great South Bay: Effects of Hard Clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) Restoration
Presenter: Michael Doall, Functional Ecology Lab in the Ecology and Evolution Department at Stony Brook University
Date and Time: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 at 12:00 p.m.

Lecture Overview: Overexploitation and degraded environmental conditions have depleted populations of hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria, in Long Island’s Great South Bay. In an effort to restore this important component of the marine ecosystem, The Nature Conservancy has created hard clam spawner sanctuaries there. Michael Doall, manager of the Functional Ecology Lab in the Ecology and Evolution Department at Stony Brook University, will discuss the impacts of increasing hard clam populations on benthic biodiversity, as well as examine the potential ecosystem benefits of hard clam restoration efforts.

 

NEW ADDITION! Forgotten Floras: Making the Case for Vouchered Plant Collections
Presenter: Dr. Donna Vogler, State University of New York College at Oneonta
Date and Time: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at 12:00 p.m.

Lecture Overview: In 2004, a species-area curve analysis revealed that at least 10 counties in the state documented fewer than half the plant species than predicted. Five years later, Otsego, Montgomery and Fulton counties were surveyed, generating more than 1,000 new records, including several rare and some newly invasive plants. Dr. Donna Vogler, of the State University of New York College at Oneonta, discusses the major findings of those efforts and the role of voucher-based natural history collections in the increasingly molecular and digital world of biology.

 


The Biology and Conservation Lecture Series is sponsored by the New York State Biodiversity Research Institute

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