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ON JUNE 30, 2009, THE BRI PROGRAM OFFICE WILL BE CLOSING DOWN TEMPORARILY. THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF BRI AND THE BRI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ARE WORKING TO REINSTATE STAFF AND WE HOPE TO BEGIN PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE DO NOT ANTICIPATE ANY CHANGES TO THE UPCOMING FALL 2009 BRI BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION LECTURE SERIES OR TO THE 2010 NORTHEAST NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE, SO PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.



Biology and Conservation Lecture Series – Spring 2007

Archive of Past Lectures

The following page is an archive of a past lecture series.
For the current or upcoming lecture series please visit
Biology and Conservation Lecture Series.

 

From Ferns to Fens: Highlights of Biodiversity-related Research in New York State
Wednesday, April 4, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Dr. Donald Leopold, Distinguished Teaching Professor and chair, faculty of environmental and forest biology at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, will present an overview of projects that he and his graduate students have be en engaged in over the past 20 years, including research on the hart’s-tongue fern, habitat restoration for Karner blue butterflies, ecology of old-growth American holly at the Sunken Forest on Fire Island, diversity patterns in medium and rich fens, predicting rare plant occurrences with GIS, and restoration of an urban creek and inland salt marshes.

 

Disturbing Forest and Field to Maximize Biodiversity: from Micro-disturbance for Ceruleans to Mega-disturbance for Golden-wings
Wednesday, April 11, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Disturbance ecosystems are in decline. Yet, maximum diversity on state lands requires management to create habitat heterogeneity in forests, from micro-disturbance for cerulean warblers to mega-disturbance for golden-winged warblers. Dr. John Confer, associate professor of biology at Ithaca College, will discuss some current conservation concerns for managing biodiversity, including these warblers that rely on disturbance-dependent ecosystems.

 

The Flat Rock: New York’s Native Jack Pine Forest from an Entomological Perspective
Wednesday, April 18, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Imperial moth caterpillarNew York’s sandstone barrens, known as “flat rock,” harbors the state’s only native Jack Pine. The flat rock is the most barren of barrens. Flat rock has an insect fauna that has had to adapt to severe drought, severe cold, and intense fire. State Entomologist Dr. Timothy McCabe has surveyed insects (particularly moths) on the flat rock and has elucidated the secret life of several barrens specialists.

Imperial moth caterpillar (Eacles imperialis), photo by Tim McCabe

 

Mississippian and Rare: The Plight of Fishes on the Periphery of Their Range
Wednesday, April 25, 2007 at 12:00 PM

Since the Allegheny River watershed is the only part of New York State drained by the Mississippi River system, several resident fishes are at the periphery of their range. Rarity can be dismissed as a result of their confined range, but other factors — habitat degradation, introduced species, isolation — may also play a role. Dr. Robert Daniels, curator of ichthyology and assistant director of research and collections at the New York State Museum, presents the seminar.

 


The Biology and Conservation Lecture Series is sponsored by the New York State Biodiversity Research Institute

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