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BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

ON JUNE 30, 2009, THE BRI PROGRAM OFFICE WILL BE CLOSING DOWN TEMPORARILY. THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF BRI AND THE BRI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ARE WORKING TO REINSTATE STAFF AND WE HOPE TO BEGIN PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE DO NOT ANTICIPATE ANY CHANGES TO THE UPCOMING FALL 2009 BRI BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION LECTURE SERIES OR TO THE 2010 NORTHEAST NATURAL HISTORY CONFERENCE, SO PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.



Biology and Conservation Lecture Series – Spring 2008

Archive of Past Lectures

The following page is an archive of a past lecture series.
For the current or upcoming lecture series please visit
Biology and Conservation Lecture Series.

 

Do We Still Have to Worry About Deformed Amphibians?
Presenter: Dr. Stanley Sessions, professor of biology at Hartwick College
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 2, 2008 at 12:00 p.m.

Multilegged Frog Photo 
Lecture Overview: Scientists are concerned about what causes declines in amphibian populations worldwide. Dr. Stanley Sessions, professor of biology at Hartwick College, discusses two decades of research on deformed amphibians and what concerns remain today.

 

Photo of a multilegged frog, photo by Stanley Sessions

 

 

Algal Biodiversity in Streams of New York State and Its Links with Ecosystem Function
Presenter: Dr. John Wehr, director and associate professor at the Louis Calder Center–Biological Station, Fordham University
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 9, 2008 at 12:00 p.m.

Lecture Overview: The biodiversity of algae in New York varies greatly among different streams and watersheds. John Wehr, director and associate professor at the Louis Calder Center–Biological Station, Fordham University, discusses how algal biodiversity may affect ecosystem function and measures to help understand the value of species diversity in fresh waters.

 

Rare Plant Baselines in the Adirondack Alpine: How Many Plants Are There Now?
Presenter: Dr. Tim Howard, of the New York Natural Heritage Program
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 23, 2008 at 12:00 p.m.

Lecture Overview: The alpine zone in the Adirondack Mountains hosts the highest number of rare plant species, per area, in the state. Dr. Tim Howard, of the New York Natural Heritage Program, presents the first effort to estimate population sizes by combining random sampling, geographic information systems (GIS), and likelihood methods.

 


The Biology and Conservation Lecture Series is sponsored by the New York State Biodiversity Research Institute

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