Traveling Exhibitions

AVAILABLE TRAVELING EXHIBITS
The New York State Museum is offering several traveling exhibits. We produce high-quality shows, drawn primarily from the vast collections of the Museum. For further information, including space requirements, costs and schedules, please review the individual exhibitions listed below.

For additional information:
Contact Nancy Kelley at (518) 474-0080 or nkelley@mail.nysed.gov for more information

Seneca Ray Stoddard

Seneca Ray Stoddard
Through Stoddard's camera lense, visitors can view the changing world of the Adirondacks as untouched wilderness began to give way to industry in the late 19th-century. A pioneer environmentalist, Stoddard used his breath-taking images not only to document the landscapes and beauty of the region during his time, but also to raise awareness to ensure that that same natural beauty would be available to future generations.

Frank Eckmair

Frank Eckmair: The Landscape of Memory
The Landscape of Memory explores a singular artistic vision through the Museum's extensive collection of works by Frank C. Eckmair. An internationally recognized printmaker, Eckmair had an intimate affinity for the quiet landscape of rural central New York. His subjects are its farm fields, stone walls, abandoned homes, and old barns.

Bernice Abbott

Berenice Abbott's A Changing New York: A Triumph of Public Art
This exhibition displays 38 of reknown American photographer, Bernice Abbott's, principal images of the ever-changing urban landscape of New York City architecture and design throughout the 1930s. Highlighting the often extreme contrasts between the old and the new, Abbott's "Changing New York" through its exposure of life in a city struggling through the Depression, became one of the monumental photographic achievements in the 20th Century.

Focus on Nature

Focus on Nature: Natural History Illustration
Focus on Nature (FON) is an exhibition of scientific, natural and cultural history that helps demonstrate the connection between science and images and helps stimulate an interest in natural history art among practicing artists, aspiring artists and the public.

A global Moment sign
September 11, 2001: A Global Moment
explores the global, personal, and historical significance of September 11, 2001. This major exhibition includes over 150 rare and important artifacts from the World Trade Center after its destruction, a timeline that traces the events of the day, and personal stories about everyday life and the aftermath. Visitors will gain a clearer understanding about the events of September 11, 2001 and use the exhibition as a platform to share their experiences about September 11. 

Recovery, The World Trade Center image
Recovery: The World Trade Center Recovery Operation
documents the historic process at the Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island, from September 2001 to July 2002, to recover human remains, personal objects and material evidence from the collapse of the World Trade Center. The exhibition includes a timeline of the attacks of 9/11, interpretive panels, and over 100 photographs and artifacts that trace the recovery operation after 9/11, offering the viewer a rare glimpse of hidden history.

TimeLine image
September 11, 2001 Timeline
is an accessible, affordable and easily installed exhibition designed to travel nationally to reach audiences in non-traditional exhibition settings. The timeline of events leading to September 11, 2001 begins with the groundbreaking for the Pentagon on September 11, 1941 and ends on the same date sixty years later, when Al Qaeda operatives attacked the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and a third site that was saved through the heroic actions of the crew and passengers of United Flight 93. The timeline outlines key events and iconic images of September 11, 2001.
Museum Open Tuesday-Sunday: 9:30 am to 5 pm | Carousel Hours: 10 am to 4:30 pm
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