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PUBLICATIONS :: NYSM RECORD :: Mineral Industry of the State of New York

cover Mineral Industry of the State of New York 2007–2010

by William M. Kelly




THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
Regents of The University

MERRYL H. TISCH, Chancellor, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York
MILTON L. COFIELD, Vice Chancellor, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. . . . . . . . . . . . Rochester
ROBERT M. BENNETT, Chancellor Emeritus, B.A., M.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tonawanda
JAMES C. DAWSON, A.A., B.A., M.S., Ph.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plattsburgh
ANTHONY S. BOTTAR, B.A., J.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Syracuse
GERALDINE D. CHAPEY, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Belle Harbor
HARRY PHILLIPS, 3RD, B.A., M.S.F.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hartsdale
JAMES R. TALLON, JR., B.A., M.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Binghamton
ROGER TILLES, B.A., J.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Great Neck
CHARLES R. BENDIT, B.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manhattan
BETTY A. ROSA, B.A., M.S. in Ed., M.S. in Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D. . . . . . . . . . . Bronx
LESTER W. YOUNG, JR., B.S., M.S., Ed. D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oakland Gardens
CHRISTINE D. CEA, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Staten Island
WADE S. NORWOOD, B.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rochester
JAMES O. JACKSON, B.S., M.A., PH.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albany
KATHLEEN M. CASHIN, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brooklyn
JAMES E. COTTRELL, B.S., M.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York

Commissioner of Education
President of The University of the State of New York
JOHN B. KING JR.

Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education
JEFFREY W. CANNELL

Director of the New York State Museum
CLIFFORD A. SIEGFRIED

Director, Research and Collections Division
JOHN P. HART


The State Education Department does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, genetic predisposition or carrier status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, services and activities. Portions of this publication can be made available in a variety of formats, including braille, large print or audio tape, upon request. Inquiries concerning this policy of nondiscrimination should be directed to the Department's Office for Diversity, Ethics, and Access, Room 530, Education Building, Albany, NY 12234.




Mineral Industry of the State of New York 20072010

William M. Kelly



with a report on the
Economic Impact of the New York State
Mining and Construction Materials Industry

Rochelle Ruffer and Kent Gardner

 

 

New York State Museum Record 3



2011 The New York State Education Department
Published in the United States of America
ISSN: 2156-6178
ISBN: 1-55557-256-1

NYSM logo

 

Contents

Acknowledgments
Preface

Chapter 1: Mineral Resources of New York
Historical Overview
Colonial Period
Nineteenth Century to World War I
The Modern Period
Current Production
Monetary Value

Chapter 2: Aggregates in New York

Chapter 3: Crushed Stone
General Geology
Methods
Products and Uses
Availability
Quality
Distribution
Carbonate Rock Resources
Noncarbonate Rock Resources

Chapter 4: Sand and Gravel
General Geology
Products and Uses
Availability
Methods

Chapter 5: Cement
History
Uses
Raw Materials
Products
Producers

Chapter 6: Hot Mix Asphalt
History
Use
Processes
Products
Producers

Chapter 7: Ready Mix Concrete
History
Processes
Products
Producers

Chapter 8: The Economic Impact of the New York State Mining
 and Construction Materials Industry

References Cited

Appendix 1.
Center for Governmental Research Report: The Economic Impact of the New York State Mining and Construction Materials Industry

Figures
Figure 1. Location of mines of all types in New York
Figure 2. Reclaimed talc mine, Talcville, New York
Figure 3. Wire saw used to quarry blocks of bluestone
Figure 4. Blue “granite” quarry, Ausable Forks, New York
Figure 5. Crushed stone quarry, near Saranac Lake, New York
Figure 6. Peat mine, Columbia County, New York
Figure 7. Garnet ore at Barton Corporation mine
Figure 8. Pillar of Halite mine, central New York
Figure 9. Wollastonite mine face, Lewis, New York
Figure 10. Trend in the number of permitted mining operations
Figure 11. Map of rocks suitable for crushed stone
Figure 12. USBM ground vibration guidelines
Figure 13. Typical crushed stone quarry
Figure 14. Quarry face in a carbonate rock quarry
Figure 15. Wheeled loading and hauling equipment
Figure 16a. Truckload of rock at primary crusher
Figure 16b. Rock dumped into primary crusher
Figure 17. Typical crushing and screening operation
Figure 18. Distribution of carbonate rock in New York
Figure 19. Diabase quarry in Palisades sill
Figure 20. Trailing-arm suction hopper dredge Sandy Hook
Figure 21. Cement and construction aggregate quarry, Ravena, New York
Figure 22. Typical components of a batch-type hot mix asphalt plant
Figure 23. Typical components of a drum-type hot mix asphalt plant
Figure 24. Dryer in a batch-type hot mix asphalt plant
Figure 25. Hot screen deck and mill of batch-type hot mix asphalt plant
Figure 26. Baghouse dust collection system
Figure 27. Location of hot mix asphalt plants
Figure 28. Batch and central ready mix concrete plants
Figure 29. Central ready mix concrete plant loading transit mixer
Figure 30. Location of ready mix concrete plants

Tables
Table 1. Commodities Mined in New York
Table 2. Mineral Production and Value in New York
Table 3. Value of Construction Aggregates
Table 4. Definitions and Specifications of Selected Aggregate Products
Table 5. Crushed Stone Production in New York
Table 6. Typical Size and Uses for Sand and Gravel Products
Table 7. Cement Shipments to Final Customer
Table 8. Types and Characteristics of Portland Cement
Table 9. Fillers and Modifiers Added to Asphalt Cement



Acknowledgements

The author has spent the last three decades inquiring of people in state government and the private sector about the mining industry and mineral products of New York State. He was always met with cooperation and generous offers of time and expertise. For that, he is extremely grateful. Those discussions formed the basis for this publication. Knowledge, advice, and assistance in preparation of this manuscript were freely offered by many colleagues. Deserving of specific acknowledgment are: Bruce Barkevich, New York Construction Materials Association; Alan Bauder, NYS Office of General Services (ret.); Frank Doherty, Red Wing Properties Inc.; Tom Ebert, NYS Department of Transportation; Paul Griggs, Griggs-Lang Consulting Geologists, Inc.; David Hamling, New York Construction Materials Association; John Holmes, Cobleskill Stone Products, Inc.; G. Brent Leclerc, Lehigh Hanson Co.; Christopher McKelvey, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation; Greg Novitzki, New York Construction Materials Association; Robert Osborne, NYS Department of Transportation (ret.); Jeffrey Over, State University of New York, Geneseo; Richard Pecnik, Gernatt Family of Companies; Steve Potter, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (ret.); William Skerritt, NYS Department of Transportation; Rosemary Stack, Stack Law Office; Charles A. Stokes, Callanan Industries, Inc.; Stuart Thatcher, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Charles Ver Straeten, New York State Geological Survey.

The author is very appreciative of the support from the New York State Construction Materials Association. Conversations with the Association led to the conclusion that an integrative study of the economic impact of the mining, concrete, and asphalt industries could contribute to the discussion about natural resource extraction and use in New York in an important way, and the Association rose as the major sponsor. Those acknowledged here are not responsible for and do not necessarily endorse the findings and conclusions. Responsibility for those lies solely with the author. Constructive comments by three anonymous reviewers improved this report.


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