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Additional Evidence for cal. Seventh-Century A.D. Maize Consumption at the Kipp Island Site, New York

TitleAdditional Evidence for cal. Seventh-Century A.D. Maize Consumption at the Kipp Island Site, New York
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsHart, JP, Anderson, LM, Feranec, RS
EditorRieth, CB, Hart, JP
Book TitleCurrent Research in New York State Archaeology: A.D. 700-1300
Series TitleNew York State Museum Record
Series Volume2
Pagination27-40
PublisherThe University of the State of New York
CityAlbany, New York
KeywordsKipp Island, maize, New York, Zea mays ssp. mays.
Abstract

The histories of maize in New York have changed radically over the past decade based on the recovery of phytolith assemblages from directly AMS-dated charred cooking residues adhering to the interior surfaces of pottery sherds. We now know that maize was being used as early as ca. cal 300 B.C. at the Vinette site in the Finger Lakes region. Maize phytoliths have also been found in cooking resides dating to ca. cal. A.D. 650 from the Kipp Island site. Here we present additional evidence for maize use at this time through the analysis of human teeth from a cemetery at the site that Ritchie originally dated to ca. A.D. 1000, but that now appears to date primarily to ca. cal. A.D. 650. Dental caries rates and stable carbon isotopes both indicate maize consumption at this time.