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Petroleum and Natural Gas in New York in 1936

TitlePetroleum and Natural Gas in New York in 1936
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1937
AuthorsNewland, DH, Hartnagel, CA
JournalAmerican Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers Transactions
Volume123
Pagination420-422
Keywordsgeology
Abstract

Detailed production statistics listing the operations according to producing sands, districts, etc., are not available for New York State and are scarcely obtainable without extraordinary effort and expense, hardly warranted by the current rate of developments. The oil industry is practically stabilized, so far as exploration for new sources of supply are concerned; no new pools have been tapped in the last 25 or 30 years. There is little prospect of extending the boundary of the oil fields beyond their present limits, though possibly some additional reserves may be found below the present productive sands. Natural gas, on the other hand, is not restricted to such confined areas. Drilling for gas has been fairly active, under the stimulation of some important finds in formations that previously were overlooked. The year's field operations will be covered somewhat fully. Oil production, which has been steadily advancing for a number of years, showed a further moderate gain in 1936. The output for 11 months (figures for December are not yet available) was 4,217,000 bbl., indicating a total for the year of around 4,600,000 bbl. The increase was about 10 per cent, a rate maintained for some time. Prices were more satisfactory than in the preceding five years, with an advance to $2.57 a barrel before the year's close. New York State yield is all paraffin-base, in the same class with high-grade Pennsylvania oil. Most of the output is now obtained by the water drive, which has given a new lease of life to the fields and promises to bring the total to about 200,000,000 bbl. before the known acreage has been exhausted by this method. Before its introduction the annual production was under 1,000,000 bbl. a year. The fields cover an aggrcgate area of 55,000 acres, with some 17,000 wells in operation. Development Exploring for natural gas in New York in 1936 outside of the old established pools continued actively, as in the previous year. There was an increase in total initial production. Operations were conducted in nine counties of the central and western parts of the state, and 43 wells