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On Pottery Change and Northern Iroquoian Origins: An Assessment from the Finger Lakes Region of Central New York

TitleOn Pottery Change and Northern Iroquoian Origins: An Assessment from the Finger Lakes Region of Central New York
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsHart, JP, Brumbach, HJ
JournalJournal of Anthropological Archaeology
Volume28
Pagination367-381
KeywordsEthnogenesis, Local populations, Northern Iroquoians, Pottery, Social learning
Abstract

Pots as tools is a concept that has been widely accepted and developed since Braun’s classic 1983 publication. However, in northeastern North America archaeologists continue to use pottery primarily as an aid to culture history and research problems based thereon. In central New York State it has been postulated that a change in pottery forming technique heralds the onset of Iroquoian pottery traditions at around AD 1000. Empirical data on pottery forming and two other pottery traits do not support this postulation. Rather the trends in these traits are consistent with social learning theory and changes in mobility and population aggregation. Following Engelbrecht (1999, 2003) we suggest that a more fruitful approach to understanding the evolution of northern Iroquoian groups is to be found in ethnogenesis theory as described by Moore (1994, 2001).

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaa.2009.07.001
DOI10.1016/j.jaa.2009.07.001