Resources

Information and resources are provided here for historians throughout New York State, including information about grants, state and local historical organizations and parks, governance laws and links to regional tourism contacts. 

Grants

  • Federal Grant: National Endowment for the Humanities

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
    http://www.neh.gov/grants

  • Common Heritage Grants

    Common Heritage grants support both the digitization of cultural heritage materials and the organization of public programming at community events that explore these materials as a window on a community’s history and culture.

    The Common Heritage program recognizes that members of the public—in partnership with libraries, museums, archives, and historical organizations—have much to contribute to the understanding of our cultural mosaic. Together, such institutions and the public can be effective partners in the appreciation and stewardship of our common heritage.

    The program supports day-long events organized by community cultural institutions, which members of the public will be invited to attend. At these events experienced staff will digitize the community historical materials brought in by the public. Project staff will also record descriptive information—provided by community attendees—about the historical materials. Contributors will be given a free digital copy of their items to take home, along with the original materials. With the owner’s permission, digital copies of these materials would be included in the institutions’ collections. Historical photographs, artifacts, documents, family letters, art works, and audiovisual recordings are among the many items eligible for digitization and public commemoration.

    Projects must also present public programming that would expand knowledge of the community’s heritage. Public programs could include lectures, panels, reading and discussion, special gallery tours, screening and discussion of relevant films, presentations by a historian, special initiatives for families and children, or comments by curators about items brought in by the public, workshops on preserving heritage materials, or other activities that bring humanities perspectives on heritage materials to wide public audiences. These public programs should provide a framework for a deeper understanding of the community members’ shared or divergent heritage. The programs may take place before, during, and/or after the day of the digitization event. Applicants may but need not include in their proposals a topic around which the event and the public programming would be organized. Topics proposed for the public programming may also be proposed for the digitization event.

    The applicant institution must plan, promote, and organize the event and ensure that a wide range of historical materials can be digitized and also contextualized through public programming. Since the help of additional institutions and organizations in the community may be needed to accomplish this work, the applicant must take responsibility for enlisting appropriate organizations or institutions, such as local libraries and museums, to contribute to the project, as needed.

    NEH especially welcomes applications from small and medium-sized institutions that have not previously received NEH support.

    For questions, contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at preservation@neh.gov and 202-606-8570. Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

  • Dialogues on the Experience of War Grants

    This program supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others to think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. The humanities sources can be drawn from history, philosophy, literature, and film—and they may and should be supplemented by testimonials from those who have served. The discussions are intended to promote serious exploration of important questions about the nature of duty, heroism, suffering, loyalty, and patriotism.

     

    The program awards grants of up to $100,000 that will support

     

    2.the recruitment and training of discussion leaders; and

     

    2.    following the training program, the convening of at least two discussion programs.

     

    The discussion groups can take place on college and university campuses, in veterans’ centers, at public libraries and museums, and at other community venues. Most of the participants in the discussion groups should be military veterans; others, such as men and women in active service, military families, and interested members of the public, may participate as well.

     

    Potential Resources for Dialogues on the Experience of War Projects

     

    War, military service, patriotism, pacifism, and civic duty are themes that have permeated the great works of history, literature, philosophy, and art that will form the basis of Dialogues on the Experience of War discussion programs. From the Standard of Ur to the Book of Deuteronomy, to Herodotus, Thucydides, Sun Tzu, the Mahabharata, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas, the subject of war—its causes and effects, and the experience of soldiers, sailors, civilians, and families—has animated the works of poets, philosophers, historians, artists, and theologians of the ancient and medieval world.

     

    The same is no less true in the modern world, in which great questions about war and military service have commanded sustained attention in literary, historical, artistic, and philosophical sources. Powerful works emerged from the wars of the last three centuries. Consider, for example, the writings of Carl von Clausewitz and Henry David Thoreau; poetry by Rudyard Kipling, Wilfred Owen, Anthony Hecht, and Brian Turner; histories by Russell Weigley, Drew Gilpin Faust, John Keegan, and Laura Hillenbrand; plays by Alice Dunbar-Nelson and David Rabe, artworks by Käthe Kollwitz, Pablo Picasso, and Stanley Spencer; Civil War ballads and Dmitri Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony (dedicated to the city of Leningrad in 1941).

     

    To this list may be added many powerful cinematic treatments, including La Grande Illusion (France, 1937), The Best Years of Our Lives (United States, 1946), Night and Fog (France, 1955), The Cranes Are Flying (USSR, 1957), Hell in the Pacific (United States, 1968), Das Boot (Germany, 1981), The Pianist (Poland, 2002), Turtles Can Fly (Iraq/France/Iran, 2005), and The Messenger (United States, 2009).

     

    The works listed here are offered only as examples. None of them needs to be included on proposed syllabi.

     

    Webinar

     

    You can find a recording of a recent webinar for interested potential applicants at this URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kUpWYW_gu5QmRzNDF1aEJNeEk/view

     

    Questions?

     

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Education Programs at dew@neh.gov and 202-606-8471. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

  • Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

    The Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program is merging with the Digital Humanities Implementation Grants program to create the new Digital Humanities Advancement grants program, which will have two deadlines a year. Guidelines for the new program are forthcoming and should be posted by the end of September. You can find more information about the new program at: http://www.neh.gov/divisions/odh/grant-news/the-sug-program-no-more-please-welcome-digital-humanities-advancement-grants

  • Digital Projects for the Public Grants

    Digital Projects for the Public grants support projects that significantly contribute to the public’s engagement with the humanities.

    Digital platforms—such as websites, mobile applications and tours, interactive touch screens and kiosks, games, and virtual environments—can reach diverse audiences and bring the humanities to life for the American people. The program offers three levels of support for digital projects: grants for Discovery projects (early-stage planning work), Prototyping projects (proof-of-concept development work), and Production projects (end-stage production and distribution work). While projects can take many forms, shapes, and sizes, your request should be for an exclusively digital project or for a digital component of a larger project.

    All Digital Projects for the Public projects should deepen public understanding of significant humanities stories and ideas; incorporate sound humanities scholarship; involve humanities scholars in all phases of development and production; include appropriate digital media professionals; reach a broad public through a realistic plan for development, marketing, and distribution; create appealing digital formats for the general public; and demonstrate the capacity to sustain themselves.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov

    Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

  • Humanities Access Grants

    Humanities Access grants help support capacity building for humanities programs that benefit one or more of the following groups: youth, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged populations.

    Humanities Access grants establish or augment term endowments (that is, endowments whose funds are entirely expended over the course of a set time period) to provide funding for existing programs at institutions such as public libraries, local and regional museums, historical societies, community colleges, HBCUs and tribal colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, archival repositories, and other cultural organizations. Humanities Access grants are intended to seed longer-term endowment-building efforts.

    Programs supported by Humanities Access grants might include, for example:

    • a summer project for teens at a local historical society;
    • internships for Native American students at a tribal museum; or
    • a Clemente course at a homeless shelter organized by a community college

     

    Humanities Access Grants offer two years of match-based funding to be expended through a term endowment over the final three years of the five-year grant period. Humanities Access grant funds should not be used to replace existing program funds. Instead, the grant should expand or enhance an existing exemplary humanities program.

    Institutions that have never received an NEH grant and small to mid-sized institutions are especially encouraged to apply.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Office of Challenge Grants at 202-606-8309 or at challenge@neh.gov

    Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

  • Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Grants

    The Humanities Collections and Reference Resources (HCRR) program supports projects that provide an essential underpinning for scholarship, education, and public programming in the humanities. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture, and digital objects. Funding from this program strengthens efforts to extend the life of such materials and make their intellectual content widely accessible, often through the use of digital technology. Awards are also made to create various reference resources that facilitate use of cultural materials, from works that provide basic information quickly to tools that synthesize and codify knowledge of a subject for in-depth investigation.

    HCRR offers two kinds of awards: 1) for implementation and 2) for planning, assessment, and pilot efforts (HCRR Foundations grants).

    Program questions should be directed to NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at 202-606-8570 or preservation@neh.gov

    Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

  • Landmarks in American History and Culture Grants

    The Landmarks of American History and Culture program supports a series of one-week workshops for K-12 educators. NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops use historic sites to address central themes and issues in American history, government, literature, art, music, and related subjects in the humanities.

    Each workshop is offered twice during the summer. Workshops accommodate thirty-six school teachers (NEH Summer Scholars) at each one-week session. At least one workshop week must serve a national audience and provide housing for participants. The other workshop week may also serve a national audience; alternatively, it may limit its audience to participants who are able to commute and do not require housing.

    The goals of the workshops are to:

    • increase knowledge and appreciation of subjects, ideas, and places significant to American history and culture through humanities reading and site study;
    • build communities of inquiry and provide models of civility and of excellent scholarship and teaching;
    • provide teachers with expertise in the use and interpretation of historical sites and of material and archival resources; and 
    • foster interaction between K-12 educators and scholarly experts.

     

    NEH Landmarks Workshops are academically rigorous and focus on primary sources and scholarly works relevant to major themes of American history and culture. Leading scholars should serve as lecturers or session leaders. Workshops should also enable participants to work with primary documents and develop a project.

    NEH Landmarks Workshops are held at or near sites important to American history and culture, such as presidential residences or libraries; colonial-era settlements; major battlefields; historic districts; parks and preserves; sites of key economic, social, political, and constitutional developments; and places associated with major writers, artists, and musicians. Applicants should make a compelling case for the historical significance of the site(s), the material resources available for use, and the ways in which the site(s) will enhance the workshop.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Education Programs at 202-606-8500 or landmarks@neh.gov

    Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

     

  • Media Projects: Development Grants

    The Media Projects program supports film, television, and radio projects that engage general audiences with humanities ideas in creative and appealing ways. All projects must be grounded in humanities scholarship in disciplines such as history, art history, film studies, literature, drama, religious studies, philosophy, or anthropology. Projects must also demonstrate an approach that is thoughtful, balanced, and analytical (rather than celebratory). The approach to the subject matter must go beyond the mere presentation of factual information to explore its larger significance and stimulate critical thinking. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects that we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad general audience.

    Film and television projects may be single programs or a series addressing significant figures, events, or ideas. Programs must be intended for national distribution, via traditional carriage or online distribution. The Division of Public Programs welcomes projects that range in length from short-form to broadcast-length video.

    The Division of Public Programs also encourages film and television projects that examine international themes and subjects in the humanities, in order to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world beyond the United States. These projects should demonstrate international collaboration by enlisting scholars based both in the United States and abroad, and/or by working with an international media team. The collaborations should bring broad cross-cultural perspectives to the proposed topics and should be intended primarily for U.S. public audiences.

    Radio projects, including podcasts, may involve single programs, limited series, or segments within an ongoing series. They may also develop new humanities content to augment existing radio programming or add greater historical background or humanities analysis to the subjects of existing programs. Programs receiving production grants may be either broadcast or disseminated online. They may be intended for national or regional distribution.

    NEH encourages projects that engage public audiences through multiple formats in the exploration of humanities ideas. Proposed projects might include complementary components to a film, television, or radio project. These components should deepen the audience’s understanding of the subject in a supplementary manner: for example, book/film discussion programs, supplemental educational websites, or museum exhibitions.

    Development Grants enable media producers to collaborate with scholars to develop humanities content and to prepare programs for production. Grants should result in a script and may also yield a detailed plan for outreach and public engagement in collaboration with a partner organization or organizations.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov

  • Preservation Access Training Grants

    The Preservation and Access Education and Training program is central to NEH’s efforts to preserve and establish access to cultural heritage collections. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture collections, electronic records, and digital objects. The challenge of preserving and making accessible such large and diverse holdings is enormous, and the need for knowledgeable staff is significant and ongoing.

    Preservation and Access Education and Training grants are awarded to organizations that offer national or regional education and training programs that reach audiences in more than one state. Grants aim to help the staff of cultural institutions, large and small, obtain the knowledge and skills needed to serve as effective stewards of humanities collections. Grants also support educational programs that prepare the next generation of preservation professionals, as well as projects that introduce the staff of cultural institutions to new information and advances in preservation and access practices.

    Program questions should be directed to NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at 202-606-8570 or preservation@neh.gov

    Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

  • Preservation Assistance Grants

    Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.

    Applicants must draw on the knowledge of consultants whose preservation skills and experience are related to the types of collections and the nature of the activities on which their projects focus. Within the conservation field, for example, conservators usually specialize in the care of specific types of collections, such as objects, paper, or paintings. Applicants should therefore choose a conservator whose specialty is appropriate for the nature of their collections. Similarly, when assessing the preservation needs of library, museum, or archival holdings, applicants must seek a consultant specifically knowledgeable about the preservation of these types of collections.

    The program encourages applications from small and mid-sized institutions that have never received an NEH grant. The program also encourages applications from presidentially designated institutions (Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and Universities), and from Native American tribes with significant humanities collections.

    Program questions should be directed to NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at 202-606-8570 or preservation@neh.gov

    Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

     

  • Public Humanities Project Grants

    Public Humanities Projects grants support projects that bring the ideas and insights of the humanities to life for general audiences. Projects must engage humanities scholarship to illuminate significant themes in disciplines such as history, literature, ethics, and art, or to address challenging issues in contemporary life.  NEH encourages projects that involve members of the public in collaboration with humanities scholars or that invite contributions from the community in the development and delivery of humanities programming.

    This grant program supports a variety of forms of audience engagement. Applications should follow the parameters set out below for one of the following three formats:

    Community Conversations
    This format supports one- to three-year-long series of community-wide public discussions in which diverse residents creatively address community challenges, guided by the perspectives of the humanities.

    Exhibitions
    This format supports permanent exhibitions that will be on view for at least three years, or travelling exhibitions that will be available to public audiences in at least two venues in the United States (including the originating location).

    Historic Places
    This format supports the interpretation of historic sites, houses, neighborhoods, and regions, which might include living history presentations, guided tours, exhibitions, and public programs.

    NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects may include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.  Your application must identify one primary format for your project and follow the application instructions for that format.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov

     

  • Research and Development Grants

    The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.

    This program recognizes that finding solutions to complex problems often requires forming interdisciplinary project teams, bringing together participants with expertise in the humanities; in preservation; and in information, computer, and natural science.

    All projects must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access would benefit the cultural heritage community in supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming.

    Research and Development offers two funding tiers in order to address projects at all stages of development and implementation.

    Tier I: Planning and Basic Research
    Tier I grants support the following activities:
    Planning and preliminary work for large-scale research and development projects; and stand-alone basic research projects, such as case studies, experiments, or the development of iterative tools.

    Tier II: Advanced Implementation
    Tier II grants support projects at a more advanced stage of implementation for the following activities:
    The development of standards, practices, methodologies, or workflows for preserving and creating access to humanities collections; and applied research addressing preservation and access issues concerning humanities collections.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at preservation@neh.gov

    and 202-606-8570. Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

  • Summer Seminar and Institute Grants

    These grants support professional development programs in the humanities for school teachers and for college and university faculty. NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes may be as short as one week or as long as four weeks.

    NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes:

    • provide models of excellent teaching;
    • provide models of excellent scholarship;
    • broaden and deepen understanding of the humanities;
    • focus on the study and teaching of significant topics, texts, and other sources;
    • contribute to the intellectual vitality of participants; and
    • build communities of inquiry.

     

    An NEH Summer Seminar or Institute may be hosted by a college, university, learned society, center for advanced study, library or other repository, cultural or professional organization, or school or school system. The host site must be suitable for the project, providing facilities for collegial interaction and scholarship. These programs are designed for a national audience of participants.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Education Programs at 202-606-8471 or seminst@neh.gov

    Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

  • Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Grants

    Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections.

    Libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country face an enormous challenge: to preserve collections that facilitate research, strengthen teaching, and provide opportunities for life-long learning in the humanities. Ensuring the preservation of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art, and historical objects requires institutions to implement measures that slow deterioration and prevent catastrophic loss. This work is best accomplished through preventive conservation, which encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft and from natural and man-made disasters.

    As museums, libraries, archives, and other collecting institutions strive to be effective stewards of humanities collections, they must find ways to implement preventive conservation measures that are sustainable. This program therefore helps cultural repositories plan and implement preservation strategies that pragmatically balance effectiveness, cost, and environmental impact. Sustainable approaches to preservation can contribute to an institution’s financial health, reduce its use of fossil fuels, and benefit its green initiatives, while ensuring that collections are well cared for and available for use in humanities programming, education, and research.

    All applicants, whether applying for planning or implementation projects, are required to focus on sustainable preventive conservation strategies.

    Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at preservation@neh.gov

    and 202-606-8570. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

     

  • National Archives: National Historical Publications and Records Commission

    Access to Historical Records
    The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals that promote the preservation and use of historical records collections to broaden understanding of our democracy, history, and culture. This grant program is designed to support archival repositories in preserving and processing primary source materials. The program emphasizes the creation of online tools that facilitate the public discovery of historical records.

    For more information and to apply: https://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/access.html

    Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections
    The National Historical Publications and Records Commission desires to make historical records of national significance to the United States broadly available by disseminating digital surrogates on the Internet.

    For more information and to apply: https://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/digital.html

    Public Engagement with Historical Records
    The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that encourage public engagement with historical records, including the development of new tools that enable people to engage online.

    For more information and to apply: https://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/engagement.html

    Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions
    The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals to publish documentary editions of historical records.

    For more information and to apply: https://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/editions.html

  • Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)

    Collections Assessment for Preservation Program

    The Collections Assessment for Preservation Program (CAP) is supported through a cooperative agreement between the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, Inc. (FAIC).

    The Collections Assessment for Preservation Program will build upon the former CAP program (Conservation Assessment Program) that was funded by IMLS and administered by Heritage Preservation for 24 years, until Heritage Preservation ceased operations in 2015. The new program will continue to support collections assessments for small and medium-sized museums throughout the nation.

    FAIC is currently developing the systems and infrastructure needed to run the program, and plans to announce the first call for applications from museums to participate in the program in the fall of 2016 with an early 2017 deadline. Detailed information will be posted here in the coming months.

    Program Contacts:

    Christopher J. Reich
    Senior Advisor
    creich@imls.gov
    202-653-4685

    Connie Bodner
    Supervisory Grants Management Specialist
    cbodner@imls.gov
    202-653-4636

     

    Sparks! Ignition Grants for Museums
    Grant Amount: $10,000 to $25,000
    Grant Period: Up to one year
    Cost Share Requirement:  No cost share requirements.

    The Sparks! Ignition Grants for Museums program is a special funding opportunity within the IMLS National Leadership Grants for Museums program. These small grants encourage museums to prototype and evaluate specific innovations in the ways they operate and the services they provide. Project results – be they success, failure, or a combination thereof – should offer valuable information to the museum field and the potential for improvement in the ways museums serve their communities.

    Eligibility: Museums that fulfill the general criteria for museums may apply. Public or private nonprofit agencies, organizations, or associations that engage in activities designed to advance museums and the museum profession may also apply. In addition, institutions of higher education, including public and non-profit universities, are eligible.

    Program Contacts:
    Helen Wechsler
    Supervisory Grants Management Specialist
    hwechsler@imls.gov
     202-653-4779

    Jill Connors-Joyner
    Museum Program Specialist
    jconnors-joyner@imls.gov
    202-653-4791

     

    Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services (NANH)
    Grant Amount:  $5,000 - $50,000
    Grant Period: Up to two years
    Cost Share Program:  No cost share requirement

    The Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services (NANH) program supports Indian tribes and organizations that primarily serve and represent Native Hawaiians. These grants are intended to provide opportunities to sustain heritage, culture, and  knowledge through strengthened activities in areas such as exhibitions, educational services and programming, professional development, and collections stewardship.

    Eligibility:
    Eligible applicants are federally recognized Indian tribes,
    Alaskan Native Villages and corporations, and,
    organizations that primarily serve and represent Native Hawaiians.

    Entities such as museums, libraries, schools, tribal colleges, or departments of education are not eligible applicants, although they may be involved in the administration of the projects and their staff may serve as project directors, in partnership with eligible applicants. Please see Tribal Organization eligibility criteria.

    Webinars: Learn more about museum grant programs by participating in IMLS webinars.

    Program Contacts:

    Sandra Narva
    Senior Program Officer
    snarva@imls.gov
    202-653-4634

    Sarah Glass
    Museum Program Specialist
    sglass@imls.gov
    202-653-4652

     

    National Leadership Grants for Museums
    Grant Amount: $50,000–$500,000
    Grant Period: Up to three years
    Cost Share Requirement:  In order to receive a National Leadership Grants for Museum award, you must provide funds from non-federal sources in an amount that is equal to or greater than the amount of the request. No cost sharing is expected for research projects and will not be considered in the review of the application.

    Program Overview:
    National Leadership Grants for Museums support projects that address critical needs of the museum field and that have the potential to advance practice in the profession so that museums can improve services for the American public. National Leadership Grants for Museums has three project categories:

    Learning Experiences
    IMLS supports the unique ability of museums to empower people of all ages through experiential learning and discovery. Successful projects provide high-quality, inclusive educational opportunities that address particular audience needs.

    Community Anchors
    IMLS promotes the role of museums as essential partners in addressing the needs of their communities by leveraging their expertise, knowledge, physical space, technology, and other resources. These projects strive to create a better quality of life within communities.

    Collections Stewardship
    IMLS supports the exemplary management, care, and conservation of museum collections. Projects address a clearly articulated and well-documented need and contribute to the long-term preservation of materials entrusted to the museum’s care.

    Eligibility:  Museums that fulfill the eligibility criteria for museums may apply. Public or private nonprofit agencies, organizations, or associations that engage in activities designed to advance museums and the museum profession may also apply. In addition, institutions of higher education, including public and non-profit universities, are eligible.

    Program Contacts:

    If you have questions, please contact any of the staff listed under the category that best fits your project.

    Helen Wechsler
    Supervisory Grants Management Specialist
    hwechsler@imls.gov
    202-653-4779

     

    Museums for America (MFA)
    Grant Amount: $5,000–$150,000
    Grant Period: Up to three years
    Cost Share Requirement: For applications requesting Museums for America funding of more than $25,000, you must provide funds from non-federal sources in an amount that is equal to or greater than the amount of the request. No cost sharing is permitted for applications requesting amounts of $5,000-$25,000.

    Program Overview:
    The Museums for America (MFA) program supports projects that strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve its public. MFA has three project categories:

    Learning Experiences
    IMLS supports the unique ability of museums to empower people of all ages through experiential learning and discovery. Successful projects provide high-quality, inclusive educational opportunities that address particular audience needs.

    Community Anchors
    IMLS promotes the role of museums as essential partners in addressing the needs of their communities by leveraging their expertise, knowledge, physical space, technology, and other resources. These projects strive to create a better quality of life within communities.

    Collections Stewardship
    IMLS supports the exemplary management, care, and conservation of museum collections. Projects address a clearly articulated and well-documented need and contribute to the long-term preservation of materials entrusted to the museum’s care.

    Eligibility:  Museums that fulfill the eligibility criteria for museums may apply.

    Sandra Narva
    Senior Program Officer
    snarva@imls.gov
    202-653-4634

     

    Museum Grants for African American History and Culture

    Grant Amount: $5,000-$150,000
    Grant Period: Up to three years
    Cost Share Requirement: For applications requesting Museum Grants for African American History and Culture of more than $25,000, you must provide funds from non-federal sources in an amount that is equal to or greater than the amount of the request. No cost sharing is permitted for applications requesting amounts from $5,000-$25,000.

    Program Overview:
    Museum Grants for African American History and Culture (AAHC) support projects that improve the operations, care of collections, and development of professional management at African American museums.

    AAHC grants can fund both new and ongoing museum activities and programs.

    Eligibility:
    Museums that fulfill the eligibility criteria for museums may apply. Eligible applicants include museums whose primary purpose is African American life, art, history, and/or culture, encompassing: the period of slavery; the era of Reconstruction; the Harlem renaissance; the civil rights movement; and other periods of the African American diaspora. Nonprofit organizations whose primary purpose is to support museums identified above may also apply. Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs) are also eligible. Please see program guidelines for specific eligibility criteria.

    Program Contacts:

    Mark Isaksen, Senior Museum Program Officer
    misaksen@imls.gov
    202-653-4667

     

  • National Heritage Areas

    Hudson River National Heritage Area
    Heritage Development Grants

    The Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area (HRVNHA) was established by Congress in 1996 and is funded, in part, through the National Park Service -Department of the Interior. The mission of the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area program is to recognize, preserve, protect and interpret the nationally significant cultural and natural resources of the Hudson River Valley for the benefit of the Nation.

    The HRVNHA established this grant program to provide seed money to organizations for the purposes of programming, interpretation and marketing that support the mutual goals of the HRVNHA and applicants. A total of $60,000 is available through this grant program. Projects should resonate with the following interpretive themes outlined in the HRVNHA Management Plan:

    • Freedom and Dignity (Colonial Period, Revolutionary War, Social and Political Issues, Great Americans);
    • Nature and Culture (Landscapes and Gardens, Architecture, Art and Artists, Hudson River School, Parks and Environment); and
    • Corridor of Commerce (Transportation, Industry and Commerce).

     

    These grants are intended to provide seed money to organizations for the purposes of: programming, interpretation and marketing that support the mutual goals of the HRVNHA and applicants.

    A total of $60,000 was awarded through this grant program in 2016. A 1 to 1 local match is required, and may be provided in the form of in-kind or monetary contributions.

    The Hudson River Valley Greenway is the management entity for the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area. While fulfilling the goals of this grant program, proposed projects should reflect the mission of the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area and be consistent with the goals of its Management Plan.

    Highest priority will be given to projects or programs that feature a designated Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area Heritage Site.

    If you have questions about this grant program, please call (518) 473-3835, or email the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area hrvg@hudsongreenway.ny.gov

     

    Erie Canalway National Heritage Cooridor
    Erie Canalway Grants

    This is a competitive grant program which makes awards ranging from $2,000 to $7,000. The grants fund projects that serve to advance the goals and strategies of the Erie Canalway Preservation and Management Plan. Awards must be matched dollar for dollar.

    Event and Festival Sponsorship Program

    Erie Canalway, in partnership with the NYS Canal Corporation, offers a limited number of sponsorships of up to $500 for events or festivals that showcase the Canalway Corridor's nationally significant heritage and the tremendous recreational appeal of the waterway and trails today. Municipalities or nonprofit 501(c)3 organizations are eligible.

    Technical Assistance Grants

    The Preservation League of New York State offers Technical Assistance Grants (TAG) of up to $3,000 to not-for-profit arts and cultural groups and municipalities managing historic sites, museums, arts facilities and other culturally important institutions. Grants support technical studies carried out by preservation and design professionals.

    TAG is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor has provided additional support for projects within the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

    For all Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor grant questions, contact:
    Andy Kitzmann (518) 237-7000, ext. 201.
    andy_kitzmann@partner.nps.gov

     

    Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership
    Local Heritage Grants

    The Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership (CVNHP) and the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) will provide grants of up to $2,500 for projects that involve active participation from youth and students in the research and discovery of local heritage, and the creation of new artistic expressions and interpretation of local conservation efforts through fresh perspectives and/or new technology.  In addition to the $2,500 grants, the CVNHP may provide grants of up to $5,000 for regional or state-wide organizations that focus on multiple communities, rather than a single community.

    The meanings of local cultural and natural heritage will be showcased to new audiences through research, interpretation, music, dance, writing, visual arts, and social media.  Grants may include transportation costs associated with bringing youth and student groups together to the extent that it is necessary to complete the activities described in the grant work plan.    In all cases, an emphasis will be placed on local natural and cultural heritage projects and programs that build a “sense of place” for young people.  The program is also meant to highlight local and regional conservation efforts in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016.

    The total amount of funding available for this grant category: up to $35,000.

    Contact:
    Jim Brangan
    Program Coordinator
    802-372-3213
    heritage@lcbp.org

     

  • New York State Archives Grants

    http://www.archives.nysed.gov/

    Documentary Heritage Program Grants

    The Documentary Heritage Program (DHP) is a statewide program established by law to ensure the survival of New York's documentary heritage by providing financial support and guidance to the not-for-profit organizations that hold, collect and make available the state's historical records.

    New York State-based not-for-profit organizations including, but not limited to, archives, libraries, historical societies, museums, and other organizations that hold historical records, and collect and make them publicly accessible, may use the DHP's services and apply for DHP Grants.

    In order to insure that the DHP addresses the New York State Historical Records Advisory Board’s mandate to identify, survey, collect, and make available historical records that relate to under-documented groups or subjects, the State Archives has identified and given priority to specific topical areas. Many of these records are in serious danger of being lost or neglected, yet they document major change in local communities, the State, and the Nation.

    DHP Top Priority Areas include:

    Economic Change
    New York’s history over the past centuries has encompassed vast and sometimes turbulent changes in the economic life of the state, such as the decline of heavy industry, innovations in agricultural technology and practice, and the explosion of tourism. Economic change, whether in individual towns and cities, regions, or the state as a whole, is one of the defining themes of New York’s history. 

    Military history
    New York State’s military forces and the state’s military history have had a major impact on New York since the colonial era. Military records shed light on the lives of soldiers, the struggles of the forces, as well as war’s impact on the home front, and offer researchers a unique view of our past.

    Population groups
    New York’s history has been shaped substantially by the arrival, emergence, and growth of a great diversity of groups united in varying degrees by shared culture, ethnic or racial background, socioeconomic status, beliefs or values, and experience.  Most groups include both concentrations of individuals in neighborhoods or communities and individuals spread in small clusters throughout the state.  Most will also share and nurture particular ways of life or other cultural expressions that help define the group and shape its contributions to New York’s history.

    Social reform and activism
    Efforts to achieve or oppose social, economic, cultural, environmental, religious, and political change have been central to New York’s history. Many movements begun in New York, such as those for women’s equality, child labor laws, industrial safety, environmental protection, gay rights, and the Occupy Wall Street, have spread across the nation.

    Coordinating historical records training workshops
    Working with regional organizations, businesses, ethnic and racial groups, libraries, archives and museums to ensure the identification of, permanent care for, and availability of historical records for previously underdocumented groups and topics particularly in the two priority areas noted above;

    Raising public awareness of the importance of historical records, especially for underdocumented groups and topics;

    Working with repositories and organizations regionally to seek local, state, and federal funding for projects to support historical records programming, and

    Providing advice to historical records repositories to strengthen their programs.

    Offering competitive grants for projects that address the DHP priorities;

    Encouraging development of finding aids and access to information about historical records holdings;

    Developing workshop curricula and publications on historical records techniques and issues;

    Encouraging coordinated efforts to seek federal and private funding.

    For more information, contact:
    Archival Advisory Services
    New York State Archives
    9C71 Cultural Education Center
    Albany, NY 12230
    518-474-6926
    mail: dhs@nysed.gov

     

    Local Government Records Management Improvement Fund (LGRMIF)
    http://www.archives.nysed.gov/common/archives/files/grants_lgrmif_app.pdf

    Contact us:
    Email: archgrants@nysed.gov
    Phone: (518) 474-6926

     

    Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Program

    The New York State Archives announces the availability of awards for qualified applicants to conduct research using historical records in the Archives. The Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Program is intended to support advanced work in New York State history, government, or public policy by defraying travel-related research expenses. It encourages public dissemination of research products. The program honors the New York State Archivist who managed the dramatic development of the State Archives between 1981 and 1995.

    Applicant/Project Eligibility
    Residents conduct research at the New York State Archives. Previous Residents have included academic and public historians, graduate students, independent researchers and writers, and primary and secondary school teachers. Projects involving innovative uses of the Archives, such as research for multimedia projects, exhibits, and websites, are welcomed. The topic or area of research must draw on government records in the New York State Archives. Preference will be given to projects that: (1) have application to enduring public policy issues, particularly in New York State, (2) rely on holdings that have been little used and are not available electronically or on microfilm, and (3) have a high probability of publication or other public dissemination. 

    Awards
    Awards are intended to defray costs of travel, lodging, and meals document reproduction. Effective with the 2016 awards, all awardees will receive a $250 award plus support for eligible travel-related expenses.  Previous award amounts have ranged from $100 to $4,500 depending on the length of stay at the State Archives and research expenses. Research visits range from a few days to several weeks depending upon the nature of the research and volume of records. (Eligible costs are indicated on the application form.)

    Applications Process/Deadline
    The fillable Application Form is available online. Certain browsers may affect the functionality of the form, so we recommend that you download the form and fill it out using Acrobat Reader or similar.  Certain computer operating systems may adversely affect automatic calculations in the budget form included with the application.  If you encounter problems with this function contact: sarahackres@nysed.gov and a separate form will be provided.    

    If you need an application form mailed to you, contact:
    New York State Archives
    Cultural Education Center, Room 9D46
    Albany, New York 12230
    Phone: 518-474-6276
    Email:  sarahackres@nysed.gov

    If you have questions about the application process email: sarahackres@nysed.gov

    Requirements

    Pre-Application Planning. Potential applicants must contact the Archives' Researcher Services staff well in advance of completing the application, to discuss their research topic and the records that they propose to use.

    Contact:
    Researcher Services
    New York State Archives
    Phone: 518-474-8955
    E-mail:  archref@nysed.gov

     

    Quinn-Archives Research Residency Program

    With the generous support of the Doris Quinn Foundation, the New Netherland Institute at the New York State Library and the New York State Archives have joined forces to offer a fellowship to facilitate research on New Netherland and on the Dutch Colonial Atlantic World. The holder of this fellowship will spend up to a year in Albany, New York, working in the rich collections of the New Netherland Institute and the New York State Archives.

    Applicant/Project Applicability
    The award is $2,500. The holder must submit a final report on their research experience in order to receive final payment of award and is expected to publicized project results through: a public presentation, creating of brochure and/or an article submission to New York Archives magazine. Pre-or postdoctoral candidates in any discipline who are researching their topic are eligible, and any project dealing with the Dutch experience in the new world before 1800 will be considered.

    For pre-application planning contact Dr. James D. Folts at (518) 474-4955 or e-mail Jim.Folts@nysed.gov

    Application forms are available on-line or by request:
    Archives Partnership Trust
    Cultural Education Center, Room 9C49
    Albany, New York 12230
    Phone: 518-473-7091
    Fax: 518-473-7058
    E-mail: sarahackres@nysed.gov

  • New Netherland Institute Research Grants

    http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/programs/research-grants/

    FULBRIGHT-NNRC STUDENT SCHOLAR RESEARCH GRANT

    The New Netherland Research Center (NNRC), a combined endeavor of the New Netherland Institute (NNI) and the Office of Cultural Education, New York State Education Department (NYSED/OCE), offers a joint Student Scholar Research Grant with the Fulbright Center of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

    The New Netherland Research Center provides a grant of $ 3,000 for research, which is intended to defray the cost of a three-month residence at the NNRC, with the research taking place at the NNRC itself, the New York State Library and the New York State Archives in Albany, New York. The research must take place in the field of New Netherland History and the Dutch Atlantic World, using the Records of New Netherland. Genealogical research is excluded.

    The grant will be paid out by the NNRC in monthly installments after submission and acceptance by the director of the NNRC of a monthly progress report. At the end of the residence, the grant recipient must submit a report of the results of the research and explain these in a lecture, both in English, before the final installment will be paid.

    Candidates for the Fulbright-New Netherland Research Center student scholar grant must fulfill the following conditions:

    •  prior to departure be in possession of a Bachelor’s degree
    • have good command of modern and seventeenth-century Dutch
    • give a clear description of the purpose and the plan of the research
    • preferably be engaged in writing a dissertation as Ph.D. candidate at a Dutch university
    • applications from junior scholars are also possible

     

    In addition, the Fulbright Center stipulates that candidates must have Dutch nationality, but not dual (Dutch and American) citizenship, not be presently residing in the US or having resided there within the past few years, and must return to the Netherlands at the end of the student residency. Fulbright grant recipients are ineligible for a visa to the US for work or immigration, which does not exclude a visit as tourist or conference attender. This condition cannot be avoided by applying for another US visa. During the grant period the student will have limited health insurance.

    Further Fulbright Conditions, Application Guide, and Application Form
    *The application must include an invitation to apply from the Director of the New Netherland Research Center. To request an invitation, email Dr. Charles T. Gehring (charles.gehring@nysed.gov) giving a brief description of your topic.

    Applications are to be submitted to the Fulbright Center.

    For its complete, official conditions and application guide and form, go to:
     http://www.fulbright.nl/programmas/fulbright-programma/fulbright-voor-pr...

     

    CHARLES W. WENDELL RESEARCH GRANT

    The New Netherland Research Center (NNRC), a joint endeavor of the New Netherland Institute (NNI) and the Office of Cultural Education, New York State Education Department (NYSED/OCE), has established a Research Grant with financial support from the Charles W. Wendell Memorial Fund. This annual grant will honor the memory of Dr. Charles W. Wendell, a valued trustee, vice-president, and president of the New Netherland Institute’s Board of Trustees from 2000 to 2015. The grant covers a period of one week up to six months, part of which may be devoted to residency at the NNRC, and provides a stipend of $1,000 – $ 5,000, depending upon the scope of the project. A time frame for fulfilling the grant requirements will be established in consultation with the Director of the NNRC. No housing, travel funds, or health insurance are provided.

    The research project must deal with the Dutch experience in North America and the Dutch Atlantic World, and is expected to result in a publishable article or a component of a larger work. Researchers in any discipline, including family history or biography, are encouraged to apply. The research should draw attention to the rich collection of primary and secondary sources relating to the Dutch colonial experience in America at the New Netherland Research Center, the New York State Archives, the New York State Library, or other repositories, including online New Netherland manuscript translations. A working knowledge of contemporary and seventeenth-century Dutch and a period of residency at the NNRC may be required, depending upon the requirements of the research topic.

    The stipend is payable in equal installments upon acceptance by the Director of the NNRC of a progress report, to be submitted at regular intervals determined in consultation with the Director. At the conclusion of the grant period, the grant recipient must submit a satisfactory work product prior to receipt of the final installment.

    Applications must consist of a curriculum vita and a cover letter outlining the research topic and a work plan. Recommendations will be accepted. Applications may be sent to nyslfnn@nysed.gov

    Please use Charles W. Wendell Research Grant as subject! Or they may be submitted to the Grants Committee, New Netherland Institute, P.O. Box 2536, ESP Station, Albany, NY 12220-0536

     

    NNRC STUDENT SCHOLAR IN RESIDENCE RESEARCH GRANT

    The New Netherland Research Center (NNRC), a joint endeavor of the New Netherland Institute (NNI) and the Office of Cultural Education, New York State Education Department (NYSED/OCE), with financial support from the Government of the Netherlands, announces the NNRC Student Scholar in Residence Research Grant. The grant covers a period of up to three months in residence and provides a stipend of $5,000. A time frame for fulfilling the grant requirements will be established in consultation with the Director of NNRC. No housing, travel funds, or health insurance are provided.

    Scholars beyond the undergraduate level and actively working on a thesis, dissertation, or scholarly article are invited to apply. Research must be conducted at the New Netherland Research Center, New York State Library, and the New York State Archives, Albany, NY, in the field of New Netherland history and the Dutch Atlantic world, using the Records of New Netherland. Candidates must indicate their research topic in their application. Genealogical research topics are excluded. The applicant should have a working knowledge of contemporary and seventeenth-century Dutch.

    The $5,000 stipend is payable in equal installments upon submission and acceptance by the Director of NNRC of a monthly progress report. At the conclusion of the residency, the student scholar must submit a written report based on their work and deliver a public lecture on their research findings prior to receipt of their final installment.

    Applications must consist of a curriculum vita, two letters of recommendation, and a cover letter outlining the research topic and work plan. Applications may be sent to nyslfnn@nysed.gov

    Please use Student Scholar Grant as subject! Or they may be submitted to the Grants Committee, New Netherland Institute, P.O. Box 2536, ESP Station, Albany, NY 12220-0536.

     

  • I Love NY Market NY Grants

    http://www.iloveny.com/articles/view/market-ny-information-guidelines/83...

    Market New York is a grant program established to strengthen tourism and attract visitors to New York State by promoting destinations, attractions and special events. Funding is available for tourism marketing initiatives, capital/construction projects and the recruitment and/or execution of meetings, conferences, conventions, festivals, athletic competitions and consumer and industry trade shows. The Market New York program and each funded proposal will work to support the long term strategic plans for economic growth as put forth by the Regional Economic Development Councils (REDCs).

    Market New York applicants are required to submit project proposals through the Consolidated Funding Application (CFA).

    For more information about the REDCs, the CFA Process and to fill out an application, visit https://apps.cio.ny.gov/apps/cfa/

  • New York State Council on the Arts

    https://www.nysca.org/

    Regional Economic Development Grants

    Funding opportunities are available through the Regional Economic Development Council program (REDC) for projects designed to enhance and transform the cultural and economic vitality of New York State communities. Arts and culture activities enrich and strengthen community, civic and social life in New York State. Successful proposals will demonstrate significant economic and community development impact that positions arts, culture and heritage at the core of local development and revitalization efforts.

    Applications made to this program are exempt from NYSCA’s two request limit. However, organizations may only submit ONE application to the Regional Economic Development Program. The request must be distinctly different from a request submitted to another NYSCA program.

    Applications made to this program are submitted through the online Consolidated Funding Application, CFA. To access the information on the Regional Economic Development Program and to access the CFA grant portal, please visit https://regionalcouncils.ny.gov

    All required application questions must be completed and supporting documents must be uploaded before applicants can finalize and submit their applications. It is strongly recommended that applicants submit proposals well in advance of the close date to avoid any submission issues.

    Prequalification
    All Applicants must be registered with Grants Gateway and be in Prequalified status at the time and date that the application is due. If you are not Prequalified at that time and date, your application will not be considered. For more information about Grants Gateway and Prequalification, please visit the Grants Reform website http://www.grantsreform.ny.gov/Grantees.

    The Grants Reform help desk can be reached at (518) 474-5595.

    If you are already prequalified, please check your vault status to ensure that none of your documents expires prior to the REDC application deadline. New to Grants Gateway? Visit https://grantsgateway.ny.gov for information on how to begin the prequalification process.

    Program Staff
    Arian Blanco, (212) 459-8815
    Orin Chait, (212) 459-8835

     

    Facilities Grants
    Arts, cultural and heritage organizations that own or lease buildings face myriad challenges in managing those structures. Through Facilities support NYSCA makes strategic investments in supporting those organizations to help them become more physically accessible, stabilize their facility, support their artistic efforts, and become more sustainable for their communities. Strong Facilities projects combine excellence in design with informed decisions which will positively affect the future of arts, cultural and heritage organizations across the state.

    Funding Categories

    • Capital Equipment
    • Capital Projects
    • Design Studies
    • Regrants and Partnerships

     

    Program Staff
    Christine Leahy, (212) 459-8818
    http://www.arts.ny.gov/public/guidelines/GG17/FY17Facilities_Guidelines_...

     

    Museum Grants
    Museums allow us to experience great art, to discover stories about objects, and to explore worlds both new and familiar. Within museums arts and cultural activities may be very diverse. But, at their heart is an emphasis on the exhibition and interpretation of art, objects or an historic space. NYSCA advances museums and related professional service organizations by offering support for arts, cultural and heritage activities. The Museum Program underscores the importance of clear planning to foster stronger institutions, and encourages creative thinking to better serve the public.

    Funding Categories

    • General Operating Support
    • Project Support
    • Regrants and Partnerships

     

    Program Staff
    Kristin Herron, (212) 459-8825
    Fabiana Chiu-Rinaldi, (212) 459-8828
    http://www.arts.ny.gov/public/guidelines/GG17/FY17Museum_Guidelines_Appl...

     

    State & Local Partnerships Grants
    State and Local Partnerships (SLP) fosters the growth and development of arts and culture at the local level in all of the state’s communities and regions. SLP provides support to Local Arts Councils, Multi-Arts Centers, and Multi-Arts Service Organizations operating at the regional, county, and local levels that advance arts and cultural initiatives across artistic disciplines and offer comprehensive arts services essential to the state's continued cultural development.

    SLP also manages Decentralization (DEC), the Council's statewide regrant program. DEC provides support for community-based arts activities through a local decision-making grant process that reflects the unique character of each of the state's communities. DEC is administered through a network of local arts organizations and is available to artists and organizations in each of the state's 62 counties.

    Funding Categories

    • General Operating Support
    • Organizational Capacity Building
    • Regrants and Partnerships
    • Services to the Field
    • Decentralization

     

    Program Staff
    Arian Blanco, (212) 459-8815
    Leanne Tintori Wells, (212) 459-8816
    http://www.arts.ny.gov/public/guidelines/GG17/FY17StateLocalPartnerships...

     

  • New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (ORPHP)

    http://parks.ny.gov/

    Historic Preservation Grant Program
    The Historic Preservation program is to improve, protect, preserve, rehabilitate, restore or acquire properties listed on the State or National Registers of Historic Places and for structural assessments and/or planning for such projects. Properties not currently listed, but scheduled for nomination review at the State Board for Historic Preservation meeting are eligible to apply.

    Questions about or proposals for listing on the State or National Register should be directed to the OPRHP National Register Unit at (518) 237-8643.

    All work must conform to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. To ensure the public benefit from the investment of state funds, preservation covenants or conservation easements will be conveyed to the State (OPRHP) for all historic property grants.

    Funding Priorities
    Each year the Commissioner establishes program priorities for which projects will receive additional points.

    Rating Criteria
    The Priority Evaluation Form is based on the following rating criteria:

    • the ability of the project sponsor to initiate and complete the project on a timely basis, at a reasonable cost, and operate or maintain the completed project;
    • the relationship of the project to a local, regional and/or statewide planning document or other assessment of need;
    • the degree to which local recreation, conservation or open space deficiencies will be addressed by the project;
    • State and Federal mandates;
    • annual programmatic and funding priorities;
    • the extent to which the project protects, enhances or interprets natural, cultural or historic resources;
    • the degree to which the project will primarily serve either a densely populated area or an area where a substantial proportion of the population is of low income or otherwise disadvantaged or underserved;
    • the historic significance of the property in the National, State or local context and;
    • the degree to which the project will increase public stewardship or awareness of historic resources.

     

    Among the rating criteria, the Commissioner may award any of the following factors up to a maximum of ten points.
    All applications will be reviewed for the relevance of these to the project scope:

    • the geographic distribution of other fundable projects in any given application cycle;
    • consideration may be given to projects in areas that have or have not received funding in recent cycles or where funding is not commensurate with the population of the area. This will be based on the proximity to other funded sites and the diversity of projects being funded on a regional and local basis, as well as the service area of the developed or planned facilities.
    • the extent to which the project will maximize the use and accessibility of a facility;
    • consideration may be given to projects where funding will allow underutilized facilities to be accessed or to develop underutilized resources for public use. This will be based on the resources offered by the facility, the use of those resources and whether the proposed project will help the facility expand and enhance its public use.
    • special engineering, environmental and historic preservation concerns or benefits;
    • consideration may be given to develop particularly significant resources and facilities or to develop innovative approaches to preserve valuable resources. This will be based on the type of resource being developed or rehabilitated; its rarity on a local, regional, statewide and national basis; the ability of an innovative technology to address an emergency or mitigate future problems; how well a technology can be "exported" for use on other properties and resources; and how/if the project will allow public access that would not otherwise be available.
    • the past performance, if any, of the project sponsor on previous projects;
    • consideration may be given to how timely an applicant completed previous projects, including its reporting requirements; how successful it was in outreach, especially to minority- and woman-owned businesses; the ongoing upkeep and maintenance of the property; and its cooperation in allowing OPRHP to complete inspections and other follow-up actions.

     

    Applications will be reviewed, rated and awarded as ranked on a regional basis, competing only against others in their region and category.

     

    Heritage Area Grants Program
    The Heritage Area program is for projects to acquire, preserve, rehabilitate or restore lands, waters or structures, identified in the approved management plans for Heritage Areas designated under section 35.03 of the Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Law and for structural assessments or planning for such projects. For a list of designated Heritage Areas with approved Management Plans and a map of Heritage Area boundaries, follow this link: http://parks.ny.gov/historic-preservation/heritage-areas.aspx

    For an endorsement letter from the Heritage Area, consult with the Heritage Area.

    Funding Priorities
    Each year the Commissioner establishes program priorities for which projects will receive additional points.

    Rating Criteria
    The Priority Evaluation Form is based on the following rating criteria:

    • the degree to which the project contributes to the preservation, restoration or enhancement of natural, historic or cultural resources related to the interpretive theme(s) in the local heritage area's approved management plan
    • the degree to which the project enhances the function and visual quality of the local heritage area
    • the impact of the facility on the local economy or its contribution to established economic development plans
    • the relationship of the project to a local, regional and/or statewide planning document or other assessment of need
    • the degree to which the project will primarily serve either a densely populated area or an area where a substantial proportion of the population is of low income or otherwise disadvantaged or underserved
    • the degree to which the project directly serves or benefits heritage area visitors and users
    • the applicant's ability to initiate and complete the project on a timely basis, at a reasonable cost, and operate or maintain the project annual programmatic and funding priorities
    • annual programmatic and funding priorities

     

    Among the rating criteria, the Commissioner may award any of the following factors up to a maximum of ten points. All applications will be reviewed for the relevance of these to the project scope:

    • the geographic distribution of other fundable projects in any given application cycle;
    • consideration may be given to projects in areas that have or have not received funding in recent cycles or where funding is not commensurate with the population of the area. This will be based on the proximity to other funded sites and the diversity of projects being funded on a regional and local basis, as well as the service area of the developed or planned facilities.
    • the extent to which the project will maximize the use and accessibility of a facility;
    • consideration may be given to projects where funding will allow underutilized facilities to be accessed or to develop underutilized resources for public use. This will be based on the resources offered by the facility, the use of those resources and whether the proposed project will help the facility expand and enhance its public use.
    • special engineering, environmental and historic preservation concerns or benefits;
    • consideration may be given to develop particularly significant resources and facilities or to develop innovative approaches to preserve valuable resources. This will be based on the type of resource being developed or rehabilitated; its rarity on a local, regional, statewide and national basis; the ability of an innovative technology to address an emergency or mitigate future problems; how well a technology can be "exported" for use on other properties and resources; and how/if the project will allow public access that would not otherwise be available.
    • the past performance, if any, of the project sponsor on previous projects;
    • consideration may be given to how timely an applicant completed previous projects, including its reporting requirements; how successful it was in outreach, especially to minority- and woman-owned businesses; the ongoing upkeep and maintenance of the property; and its cooperation in allowing OPRHP to complete inspections and other follow-up actions.

     

    Applications will be reviewed, rated and awarded as ranked on a regional basis, competing only against others in their region and category.

     

    Certified Local Government Grant Program
    Each federal fiscal year, New York State sets aside ten percent of the state's allocation of federal historic preservation funds for pass-through to Certified Local Governments. These funds are awarded on the basis of competition among eligible applications, evaluated and ranked according to the established selection criteria. Past grant awards have ranged from $1,200 to $29,000, with most in the $5,000 to $15,000 range. The total amount of available funding varies each year with the federal allocation.

    Eligibility: Only completed applications accompanied by all necessary documentation will be considered for funding. CLG grants are only awarded to Certified Local Governments in good standing. For local governments applying for CLG status, reviews of requests for CLG status and grant applications can be done simultaneously.

    Project Scheduling: Generally, grants are under contract two to three months after the application is filed. Grant projects must be completed in the fiscal year of the award or the fiscal year following. Projects that cannot meet this schedule should be phased to accommodate the funding cycle.

    Pre-applications: Local governments wishing guidance in developing subgrant applications may submit proposed projects for SHPO review at any time. The pre-application should be as detailed as possible and should conform to the standard application format. Within a month of receipt, SHPO staff will review the proposal and advise the applicant of any revisions necessary for projects to meet program standards and priorities.

    Eligible activities: CLG funding may be applied to many kinds of projects that address the goals of identifying, evaluating, nominating, and protecting a community's cultural resources. Project categories identified as priorities are training for municipal officials; public education programs, surveys and designations undertaken as part of a comprehensive plan, correction of deficiencies in CLG performance, and demonstration projects on critical issues, such as compliance with state building and fire codes.

    Method of Payment: Payment is made only on a reimbursement basis, following submission of completed work and documentation of total expenditures. Communities are encouraged to contribute funds or in-kind services equaling at least 40% of the total project cost.

    Send completed grant application forms to:
    CLG Program-Grants Management Bureau
    NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
    Agency Building One, Empire State Plaza
    Albany NY 12238

    For Additional information, contact CLG Coordinator, Dan McEneny at (518) 268-2162 or at:
    CLG Program/NYS OPRHP
    Peebles Island State Park
    PO Box 189
    Waterford NY 12188-0189

     

    OPRHP Regional Grants Coordinator Contacts
    To determine the appropriate Regional Grants Officer to contact, please identify the county in which the project is located.

    Western New York Region
    Counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie & Niagara
    Noelle Kardos
    Beaver Island State Park, 2136 West Oakfield, Grand Island, NY 14072
    (716) 773-5292, Fax (716) 773-4150

    Central New York Region
    Counties: Cayuga, Cortland, Madison, Onondaga & Oswego
    Jean Egenhofer
    Clark Reservation State Park
    6105 East Seneca Turnpike, Jamesville, NY 13078-9516
    (315) 492-1756, Fax (315) 492-3277

    Finger Lakes Region
    Counties: Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Seneca, Wayne, Wyoming & Yates
    Kathleen McIsaac
    2221 Taughannock Park Road, Trumansburg, NY 14886
    (607) 387-7041, Fax (607) 387-3390

    Mohawk Valley Region
    Counties: Fulton, Herkimer, Montgomery, Oneida, Otsego & Schoharie
    Jean Egenhofer
    Clark Reservation State Park
    6105 East Seneca Turnpike, Jamesville, NY 13078-9516
    (315) 492-1756, Fax (315) 492-3277

    Long Island Region
    Counties: Nassau & Suffolk
    Traci Christian
    Belmont Lake State Park, PO Box 247, Babylon, NY 11702
    (631) 321-3543, Fax (631) 321-3721

    Southern Tier Region
    Counties: Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Delaware, Schuyler, Steuben, Tioga & Tompkins
    Kathleen McIsaac
    2221 Taughannock Park Road, Trumansburg, NY 14886
    (607) 387-7041, Fax (607) 387-3390

    New York City Region
    Counties: Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, & Richmond
    Merrill Hesch
    NYS OPRHP Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. State Office Building, 163 West 125th Street, 17th Floor, New York, New York 10027
    (212) 866-2599, Fax (212) 866-3186

    Mid-Hudson Region
    Counties: Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster & Westchester
    Erin Drost
    NYS OPRHP Taconic Regional Office, 9 Old Post Road, Staatsburg, NY 12580\
    (845) 889-3866, Fax (845) 889-8321
     

    Capital Region
    Counties: Albany, Columbia, Greene, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Warren & Washington
    Danielle Dwyer
    Saratoga Spa State Park, 19 Roosevelt Drive
    Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-6214
    (518) 584-2000, Fax (518) 584-5694

    North Country Region
    Counties: Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lewis & St. Lawrence
    Sunshine Jenkins
    Keewaydin State Park, Alexandria Bay, NY 13607
    (315) 482-2593, Fax (315) 482-9413

     

Links to Historical Organizations & Resources

Laws Governing History Bodies in NY State

  • New York Arts and Cultural Affairs Law

    New York Arts and Cultural Affairs Law

     

    § 57.01. 

     

     

    Office of state history

     

     

    § 57.02

     

    There shall be in the education department the office of state history.

     

     

    § 57.03

     

    1. Each month of November following the effective date of this section shall be designated as New York state history month.

    2. The purpose of this month shall be to celebrate the history of New York state and recognize the contributions of state and local historians.

    3. The commissioner of education, through the office of state history is hereby authorized to undertake projects to recognize New York state history month.  Such projects may include the creation of an essay contest for state residents who are enrolled in any elementary or secondary education program which shall reflect upon the importance of New York state history.  Any project or projects created pursuant to this subdivision may, in the discretion of the commissioner of education, authorize non-monetary awards to be given to project participants or project winners as such commissioner may deem appropriate.

     

    § 57.04

     

    It shall be the function of the office of state history:

    1. To collect, edit and publish, with the approval of the commissioner of education, any archives, records, papers or manuscripts that are deemed essential or desirable for the preservation of the state's history.

    2. To prepare and publish, with the approval of the commissioner of education, or assist in the preparation and publication of, works relating to the history of the colony and state of New York.

    3. To acquire, administer, preserve, exhibit, interpret, and, in conformity with the regulations of the commissioner of education, to loan, exchange or dispose of historical objects of personal property relating to the history of the colony and state of New York;  and to advise any state agency, board, commission, office, civil subdivision, institution, organization, or individual on the acquisition, administration, preservation, exhibition, interpretation, and disposition of historical objects.

    4. To perform the functions of the state education department set forth in section 19.11 of the parks, recreation and historic preservation law with respect to historic sites under the jurisdiction of the office of parks, recreation and historic preservation;  and to advise and assist any political subdivision of the state and any institution, organization or individual concerning the designation, acquisition, administration, interpretation, use and disposition of any historic site, property or place relative to the history of the colony and state of New York, and to coordinate educational programs and projects at such historic sites or properties.

    5. To advise and assist any state agency, board, commission, office, civil subdivision, institution or organization in the planning and execution of any commemorative event relating to the history of the colony and state of New York or New York's participation in commemorative events outside of the state.

    6. To perform other functions or duties assigned the office by the commissioner of education.

     

    § 57.07

     

    1. A local historian shall be appointed, as provided in this section, for each city, town or village, except that in a city of over one million inhabitants a local historian shall be appointed for each borough therein instead of for the city at large;  and a county historian may be appointed for each county.  Such historian shall be appointed as follows:  For a city, by the mayor; for a borough, by the borough president;  for a town, by the supervisor;  for a village, by the mayor;  for a county, by the board of supervisors.  Such historian shall serve without compensation, unless the governing board of the city, town, village or county for or in which he or she was appointed or in the city of New York, the mayor, shall otherwise provide.  In a city having a board of estimate, other than the city of New York, a resolution or ordinance establishing compensation or salary for such historian shall not take effect without the concurrence of such board.  Each local government historian shall promote the establishment and improvement of programs for the management and preservation of local government records with enduring value for historical or other research;  encourage the coordinated collection and preservation of nongovernmental historical records by libraries, historical societies, and other repositories;  and carry out and actively encourage research in such records in order to add to the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the community's history.  The local authorities of the city, town, village or county for which such historian is appointed, may provide the historian with sufficient space in a safe, vault or other fire proof structure for the preservation of historical materials collected.  Such local authorities and also the board of supervisors of each of the counties of the state are hereby authorized and empowered to appropriate, raise by tax and expend moneys for historical purposes within their several jurisdictions, including historical edifices, the erection of historical markers and monuments, the collection of war mementos, and, either alone or in cooperation with patriotic or historical organizations, the preparation and publication of local histories and records and the printing and issuing of other historical materials in aid of the work of the local historian.

    2. Such local authorities and also the board of supervisors of each of the counties of the state are hereby authorized and empowered, in their discretion, to contract with the trustees of an historical association for the support of any or all historic edifices situated within the boundaries of such municipality;  or may share the cost of maintaining the same as agreed with other municipal bodies;  or may contract with the trustees of such historical associations to maintain said historic edifices for public use under such terms and conditions as may be stated in such contract.  The amount agreed to be paid for such use under such contract shall be a charge upon the municipality and shall be paid in the same manner as other municipal charges, except in a city having a board of estimate, other than the city of New York, such contracts and any payments made thereunder shall be approved by such board of estimate.  In the city of New York, such contracts and any payments thereunder shall be approved by the mayor.

    3. Such local authorities are hereby authorized to establish and collect reasonable charges to defray the cost of searching for and reproducing copies of written or printed historical materials collected.

     

    § 57.09

     

    It shall be the duty of each local historian, appointed as provided in the last section, in cooperation with the state historian, to collect and preserve material relating to the history of the political subdivision for which he or she is appointed, and to file such material in fireproof safes or vaults in the county, city, town or village offices.  Such historian shall examine into the condition, classification and safety from fire of the public records of the public offices of such county, city, town or village, and shall call to the attention of the local authorities and the state historian any material of local historic value which should be acquired for preservation.  He or she shall make an annual report, in the month of January, to the local appointing officer or officers and to the state historian of the work which has been accomplished during the preceding year.  He or she shall, upon retirement or removal from office, turn over to the local county, city, town or village authorities, or to his or her successor in office, if one has been then appointed, all materials gathered during his or her incumbency and all correspondence relating thereto.  It shall be the duty of the county historian to supervise the activities of the local historians in towns and villages within the county in performing the historical work recommended by the state historian, and also to prepare and to present to the board of supervisors a report of the important occurrences within the county for each calendar year.  The state historian, at regular intervals, not less than once a year, shall indicate to the local historians the general lines along which local history material is to be collected.

     

    § 57.11

     

    A public officer who refuses or neglects to perform any duty required of him by this article or to comply with a recommendation of the commissioner of education under the authority of this article, shall for each month of such neglect or refusal, be punished by a fine of not less than twenty dollars.

     

  • New York County Law § 400. 

    New York County Law § 400. 

     

    Officers;  manner of selection;  term;  vacancies

     

    4. (a) Appointive.  There shall continue to be appointed in the manner prescribed by law a clerk of the board of supervisors, a county attorney, county superintendent of highways, sealer of weights and measures and county historian.  The board of supervisors may by local law provide for the appointment of additional county officers, define their powers and duties not inconsistent with law, and fix the term of their office.  No officer appointed for a fixed term shall be removed by the board during his term without written charges and the opportunity to be heard. 

  • New York Military Law § 24. 

    New York Military Law § 24. 

     

    Bureau of war records;  completion and preservation of the records and relics;  free inspection of the same and quarters in the capitol

     

    6. a. The books, records, relics and other property in such bureau shall be open for inspection and use, except the use of the colors, standards and battle flags, at such reasonable hours and under such regulations as the chief of staff of the state may determine.

    b. No property placed in such bureau for the purposes of this section shall be removed therefrom, or from the immediate custody and control of the chief of staff of the state, except as follows:

    (1) colors, standards, battle flags and guidons received from the United States may be turned over by the chief of staff, with the approval of the governor, under such conditions as the governor may prescribe, to active organizations of the New York national guard and New York naval militia, representing the organizations which carried such colors, standards, battle flags and guidons while in the active military service of the United States;

    (2) the chief of staff of the state, subject to the approval of the adjutant general, may lend any of the property placed in such bureau for the purposes of this section to a public corporation or agency thereof;  state institution or other state agency;  educational corporation or institution;  museum;  or historical society under such conditions as the chief of staff may prescribe;

    (3) notwithstanding any other provision of law, the chief of staff of the state, subject to the approval of the adjutant general, may destroy, sell or otherwise permanently dispose of any property in such bureau, except books and records, provided he:

    (a) advises the state historian of the nature of the property;

    (b) certifies to the state historian that such property no longer has sufficient administrative, historical or military value to warrant its retention;  and

    (c) receives the consent of the state historian to the destruction, sale or other permanent disposition of the property;

    (4) books and records in such bureau shall be disposed of or destroyed in accordance with the provisions of subdivision eleven of section 57.05 of the arts and cultural affairs law.

  • New York Not-For-Profit Corporation Law § 1401. 

    New York Not-For-Profit Corporation Law § 1401. 

     

    Private and family cemetery corporations

     

    (b) Removal of remains from private cemeteries to other cemeteries.  The supervisor of any town containing a private cemetery may remove any body interred in such cemetery to any other cemetery within the town, if the owners of such cemeteries and the next of kin of the deceased consent to such removal.  The owners of a private cemetery may remove the bodies interred therein to any other cemetery within such town, or to any cemetery designated by the next of kin of the deceased.  Notice of such removal shall be given within twenty days before such removal personally or by certified mail to the next of kin of the deceased if known and to the clerk and historian of the county in which such real property is situated and notice shall be given to the New York state department of state, division of cemeteries.  If any of the deceased are known to be veterans, the owners shall also notify the division of veterans' affairs.  In the absence of the next of kin, the county clerk, county historian or the division of veterans' affairs may act as a guardian to ensure proper reburial

  • New York State Technology Law § 305. 

    New York State Technology Law § 305. 

     

    Use of electronic records

     

    4. The director shall study how electronic documents and the mechanisms and processes for obtaining access to and reading electronic data can be created, maintained, exchanged, and preserved by the state in a manner that encourages appropriate government control, access, choice, interoperability, and vendor neutrality. The study shall consider, but not be limited to, the policies of other states and nations, management guidelines for state archives as they pertain to electronic documents, public access, expected storage life of electronic documents, costs of implementation, and savings.  The director shall solicit comments regarding the creation, maintenance, exchange, and preservation of electronic documents by the state from stakeholders, including but not limited to, the office of the state comptroller, the office of the attorney general, the state archives, and the state historian.  The director shall also solicit comments from members of the public.  The director shall report findings and recommendations to the governor, the speaker of the assembly, and the temporary president of the senate on or before January fifteenth, two thousand eight.

Regional Tourism Promotional Organizations Contact List

  • ADIRONDACKS

    Adirondack Regional
    Tourism Council
    www.visitadirondacks.com
    800/487-6867

    Clinton County
    www.goadirondack.com
    877/242-6752

    Franklin County
    www.adirondacklakes.com
    800/709-4895

    Hamilton County
    adirondackexperience.com
    800/648-5239

    Lake Placid/Essex County
    lakeplacid.com
    800/447-5224

    Lewis County
    adirondackstughill.com
    800/724-0242

    Warren County
    visitlakegeorge.com
    800/95-VISIT

  • CAPITAL - SARATOGA

    Capital-Saratoga
    Tourism Region
    capital-saratoga.com

    Albany County
    albany.org
    800/258-3582

    Fulton County
    44Lakes.com
    800/676-3858

    Rensselaer County
    renscotourism.com
    518/270-2959

    Saratoga County
    saratoga.org
    800/526-8970

    Schenectady County
    sayschenectady.org
    800/962-8007

    Washington County
    washingtonnycounty.com
    888/203-8622

  • CATSKILLS

    Catskill Tourism Region
    visitthecatskills.com
    800/342-5826

    Delaware County
    greatwesterncatskills.com
    866/775-4425

    Greene County
    greatnortherncatskills.com
    800/355-CATS (2287)

    Sullivan County
    scva.net
    800/882-2287

    Ulster County
    ulstercountyalive.com
    800/342-5826

  • CENTRAL NEW YORK

    Central NY Region
    visitcentralnewyork.com

    Broome County /
    Greater Binghamton
    visitbinghamton.org
    800/836-6740

    Chenango County
    chenangony.org
    877/CHENANGO

    Herkimer County /
    Town of Webb
    oldforgeny.com
    877/OLD-FORGE

    Madison County
    madisontourism.com
    800/684-7320

    Montgomery County
    visitmontgomerycountyny.com
    800/743-7337

    Oneida County
    oneidacountytourism.com
    888/999-6560

    Otsego County / Cooperstown
    thisiscooperstown.com
    800/843-3394

    Schoharie County
    upstatevacations.com
    800/41-VISIT

     

  • CHAUTAUQUA-ALLEGHENY

    Chautauqua-Allegheny Region
    visitwesternny.com
    800/242-4569

    Allegany County
    discoveralleganycounty.com
    800/836-1869

    Cattaraugus County
    echantedmoutains.info
    800/331-0543

    Chautauqua County
    Convention & Visitors Bureau
    tourchautauqua.com
    866/908-4569

  • FINGER LAKES

    Finger Lakes Tourism
    Promotion Agencies
    FingerLakesTravelNY.com
    888/408-1693

    Cayuga County
    tourcayuga.com
    800/499-9615

    Chemung County
    marktwaincountry.com
    800/MARK-TWAIN
    FINGER LAKES

    Cortland County
    experiencecortland.com
    800/859-2227

    Ithaca / Tompkins
    visitithaca.com
    800/284-8422

    Livingston County
    fingerlakeswest.com
    800/538-7365

    Monroe County /
    Greater Rochester
    visitrochester.com
    800/677-7282

    Onondaga County /
    Syracuse
    visitsyracuse.org
    800/234-4SYR

    Ontario County / Finger Lakes
    Visitors Connection
    visitfingerlakes.com
    877/FUN-IN-NY

    Schuyler County / Watkins Glen
    watkinsglenchamber.com
    800/607-4552

    Seneca County
    fingerlakescentral.com
    800/732-1848

    Steuben County / Corning
    corningfingerlakes.com
    866/946-3386

    Tioga County
    visittioga.com
    800/671-7772

    Wayne County
    waynecountytourism.com
    800/527-6510

    Yates County
    yatesny.com
    800/868-YATES

  • GREATER NIAGARA

    Greater Niagara Region
    greaterniagarausa.com
    800/622-2686

    Erie County / Buffalo Niagara
    Convention & Visitors Bureau
    visitbuffaloniagara.com
    888/BUFFALO

    Genesee County
    visitgeneseeny.com
    800/622-2686

    Niagara Tourism &
    Convention Corporation
    niagara-usa.com
    877/FALLS-US

    Orleans County
    orleanscountytourism.com
    800/724-0314

    Wyoming County
    gowyomingcountyny.com
    800/839-3919

  • HUDSON VALLEY

    Hudson Valley Tourism
    travelhudsonvalley.com
    800/232-4782

    Columbia County
    columbiacounty.com
    800/724-1846

    Dutchess County
    dutchesstourism.com
    800/445-3131

    Orange County
    orangetourism.org
    800/762-8687

    Putnam County
    tourputnam.org
    845/808-1015

    Rockland County
    rocktourism.com
    800/295-5723

    Ulster County
    ulstercountyalive.com
    800/342-5826

    Westchester County
    westchestourism.com
    800/833-9282

  • LONG ISLAND

    Long Island Convention &
    Visitors Bureau
    discoverlongisland.com
    877/FUN-ON-LI

     

  • NEW YORK CITY

    NYC & Company
    nycgo.com
    800/NYC-VISIT

    Bronx
    ilovethebronx.com
    718/590-3518

    Brooklyn
    nycgo.com/brooklyn
    718/802-3820

    Queens
    itsinqueens.com
    718/263-0546

    Staten Island
    statenislandusa.com
    718/816-2000

  • THOUSAND ISLANDS

    Thousand Islands International
    Tourism Council
    visit1000islands.com
    800/847-5263

    Oswego County
    visitoswegocounty.com
    800/248-4386

    St. Lawrence County
    northcountryguide.com
    877/228-7810

Grants & Funding

NYSED Resources for Local Government Historians

Duties and Functions of New York State’s Local Government Historians
View PDF 170KB

Records Retention and Disposition Schedule for Municipal Historians
NYS Archives 

Records Retention and Disposition Schedule for County Historians
NYS Archives

Municipal historians who are appointed by NYS city, town, village or county governments are eligible to receive a NYS Library Historian Borrower's Card
NYS Library

Historical Records and the Local Government Historian
NYS Archives

Appraisal of Local Government Records for Historical Value
NYS Archives

Local History
NYS Archives

Workshop Catalog
NYS Archives